Colorado elections: How are all the ballot measures doing?

We’ll be keeping track of what Colorado’s voters have decided here.

Rita Cawlfield and Charlotte Aycrigg review ballots in Denver. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)
Rita Cawlfield and Charlotte Aycrigg review ballots in Denver. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)
Rita Cawlfield and Charlotte Aycrigg review ballots in Denver. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

So many choices! Colorado is looking at nine statewide referenda dealing with everything from slavery to the presidential primary and a number of local issues as well. We’ll be keeping track of what Colorado’s voters have decided here.

Amendment 69, which would have created a single-payer healthcare system, has failed, and Proposition 106, which allows terminally ill people to get a fatal dose of barbiturates from their doctor, has passed.

So far, it’s looking like the following issues are ahead by a healthy margin: Amendment 70, which raises the minimum wage, Amendment 71, which makes it harder to amend the constitution, and Proposition 107, which creates a presidential primary

Amendment 72, which raises cigarette taxes, and Amendment U, which involves property taxes for people who use state lands, have failed.

These results represent about 57 percent of the estimated ballots cast and come from complete results from 31 counties and partial results from 26 counties.

Statewide issues:

Amendment T bans slavery.

Yes: 49.9%
No: 50.1%

Amendment U would give a tax break to people who make less than $6,000 annually by leasing government land.

Yes: 43.2%
No: 56.8%

Amendment 69, aka ColoradoCare.

Yes: 20.5%
No: 79.5%

Amendment 70 would raise the minimum wage in Colorado.

Yes: 54.9%
No: 45.3%

Amendment 71 would make it harder to amend the state constitution.

Yes: 56.7%
No: 43.3%

Amendment 72 would increase the state cigarette tax.

Yes: 46.95%
No: 53.05%

Proposition 106, aka the “right to die” measure.

Yes: 65.2%
No: 34.8%

Proposition 107 would create a presidential primary to replace the party-run caucuses and allow unaffiliated voters to vote in that primary.

Yes: 63.8%
No: 36.2%

Proposition 108 would allow unaffiliated voters to vote in primary elections while the parties would still control, through caucuses and conventions, the process of selecting candidates for the primary.

Yes: 52.4%
No: 47.6%

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.