Denver in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Dec. 23

Firemen aim a jet of water at a collapsing chimney amid the ruins of the 23rd Avenue Presbyterian Church after the fire that destroyed the 1892 building in 1906. A crowd of spectators look at the remains of the stone building. April 16, 1906. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-5862)historic; denver public library; dpl; archive; archival; denverite

Oh, hey. I hope you’re on a couch or on a plane reading this. If you’re at work, I salute you and encourage you to get done as soon as possible, if possible, after checking out this news grab-bag. We’ve got a science fair, a Broadway vintage closing, Hillary Clinton’s team’s decision not to get involved with the electoral revolt and a couple more.

Firemen aim a jet of water at a collapsing chimney amid the ruins of the 23rd Avenue Presbyterian Church after the fire that destroyed the 1892 building in 1906. A crowd of spectators look at the remains of the stone building. April 16, 1906. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-5862) historic; denver public library; dpl; archive; archival; denverite
Firemen aim a jet of water at a collapsing chimney amid the ruins of the 23rd Avenue Presbyterian Church after the fire that destroyed the 1892 building in 1906. A crowd of spectators look at the remains of the stone building. April 16, 1906. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-5862)

Clinton aides’ position on the elector revolution:

Clinton campaign aides were in touch with Micheal Baca, the rogue Colorado elector who eventually voted for John Kasich as part of a failed plan that may get him charged. However, they really never told him anything. As this Politico story shows, the Democrats seemed to politely listen to the rogue electors’ plans without ever endorsing or discouraging them, probably so they could avoid being in a Politico story.

“I know I will have done everything I could to stop Trump but I am just a guy at the end of the day,” Baca reportedly wrote in his “final plea” for assistance. “Thank you so very much and I’ll trust whatever happens was the right decision.” (Politico)

So long, Ironwood:

The vintage shop on Broadway closes Dec. 31. I’ve never been, but it looks like owner Alison Two Eagles has nice wares there. (BusinessDen)

Teams building efficient houses for a sweet science fair:

The Solar Decathlon comes back to Denver in October, challenging teams to design and build houses that are drought tolerant, low-energy and generally sustainable. Here’s one team’s plan. (UC Davis press release)

School funding is a crazy world.

There are two big numbers about state money for schools in Colorado: the amount required by Colorado’s laws and the amount that actually gets funded. The gap between them didn’t get any smaller this year. Nic Garcia has the inaction in review. (Chalkbeat)

Prototype bike lane shut down in Colorado Springs:

They tried it and they didn’t like it. Surrounding neighborhoods opposed the new protected lane, possibly because it disrupted their “suburban design,” a project planner said. The lane stood for three months, and the city said it didn’t reduce traffic speeds or accidents, but the planner also said that’s not much time to measure. (CS Gazette)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.