Denver in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Nov. 10

Interior view of Broadway Theatre located in Metropole Hotel on Broadway, Denver, Colorado; shows balcony, private box seats, orchestra pit, stage, and scenery curtain from "A glimpse of India;" theater opened in 1890. Circa 1900. (Louis Charles McClure/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/MCC-6)historic; denver public library; dpl; archive; archival; denverite

Hey. Today’s news roundup includes talk about the future of Colorado’s anti-Trump Republicans, new homeless sweeps, the Aurora VA’s light-rail problem and young immigrants’ very real reason to be afraid.

Interior view of Broadway Theatre located in Metropole Hotel on Broadway, Denver, Colorado; shows balcony, private box seats, orchestra pit, stage, and scenery curtain from "A glimpse of India;" theater opened in 1890. Circa 1900. (Louis Charles McClure/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/MCC-6) historic; denver public library; dpl; archive; archival; denverite
Interior view of Broadway Theatre located in Metropole Hotel on Broadway. Circa 1900. (Louis Charles McClure/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/MCC-6)

What’s next for the Colorado republicans who opposed Trump?

Sen. Cory Gardner and Rep. Mike Coffman both won re-election, and both cut against Trump. Coffman may have survived in a Latino district expressly because he did that, while Gardner has gained some new power within the party regardless – so, they’re probably doing OK, as Adrian Garcia reports for us. There is, however, the possibility they’ll face primary challengers down the road. (Denverite, DP)

Gary Johnson took a lot of votes in Colorado.

He hauled 5 percent of the votes, which is twice as much as Hillary Clinton’s margin of victory in Colorado. Read Megan’s analysis. (Denverite)

Public internet is making gains.

Voters in a couple dozen Colorado municipalities opened the possibility of municipal broadband projects. (Denverite)

The city will again sweep homeless people out of Ballpark.

Dozens of people were gathered near Lawrence Street and Park Avenue West when I visited the other day. They’re there in part because social and charitable services are nearby. The city has warned them that their belongings will be removed on or after Nov. 15. (ABC7)

Tens of thousands of young Coloradans have good reason to fear deportation.

Most of them arrived before they were 19. They were granted temporary amnesty under DACA. And now the information they submitted to that program could be turned against them under Trump’s campaign promises. (Denverite)

Does Trump like marijuana?

It’s still federally illegal, and it’s unclear whether Trump and his cabinet would enforce those federal laws. For example, Chris Christie has been floated for attorney general, and he’s not very weed friendly. Still, the consensus seems to be that the new administration will leave well enough alone. (Marijuana Business Daily)

The new Aurora VA hospital is both very close and very far from light rail.

Some people want a pedestrian bridge to the East Colfax station that stands nearby, but it may be too late for that project, which was estimated to cost about $7.5 million. (The hospital construction budget is past $1 billion now.) There will be a bus shuttle from a different station, but it will still put veterans about 500 feet from the front door. (Aurora Sentinel)

Just put the water underground?

Putting basins under the earth could allow the city to store water for use in droughts, with fewer ecological impacts than a dam. It may also be cheaper. Denver Water is exploring the possibility. (9News)

Development shocker: more townhomes.

Hard to believe, I know, but a developer is planning 11 single-family residences for the intersection of 44th Avenue and Zuni Street in Sunnyside. It used to host Carniceria El Rancho and La Bonita. (BusinessDen)

The Nederland bomb suspect pleaded not guilty.

Police say the device he allegedly left by the police station was “sophisticated and contained arsenic.” (AP on Denverite)

Denver will add 200 electric vehicles to the city fleet.

Interesting stat: The number of registered electric vehicles in Colorado has grown from 20 (two-zero) in 2011 to 6,341 last December. (DP)

Turns out Dish Network is not good at predicting elections.

They called it for Hillary based on some weird combination of viewership data. However, it’s not like the actual pollsters did any better. (DBJ)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.