Denver in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Nov. 28

Harry M. Rhoads, behind the steering wheel, poses in a convertible with passenger in front of Westminster University or College, at 3455 West 83rd Avenue in Westminster (Adams County), Colorado.  Circa 1895. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-967)historic; denver public library; dpl; archive; archival; denverite

Welcome back to the real world. What’s happening here, according to the news: Pueblo should have Democrats worried, a hostel is coming to Capitol Hill, the A Line was fine, Englewood’s aiming for startups and more.

Harry M. Rhoads, behind the steering wheel, poses in a convertible with passenger in front of Westminster University or College, at 3455 West 83rd Avenue in Westminster (Adams County), Colorado. Circa 1895. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-967) historic; denver public library; dpl; archive; archival; denverite
Harry M. Rhoads, behind the steering wheel, poses in a convertible with passenger in front of Westminster University or College, at 3455 West 83rd Avenue in Westminster (Adams County), Colorado. Circa 1895. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/Rh-967)

Trump won Pueblo.

The president-elect beat Hillary Clinton by 376 votes in Pueblo County, the first Republican to take the area since Richard Nixon. Joey Bunch analyzes whether this might be a sign that Colorado Democrats are losing blue-collar white voters. (Gazette)

That self-driving beer truck is in Ohio next.

Otto’s next demonstration will happen on a road that’s soon to be outfitted with a fiberoptic network and sensors. Doesn’t look like it’s carrying beer anymore. (AP via NYT)

The Chicago Tribune tours Denver’s food markets.

Here’s a decent overview of The Source, Avanti and the like. Also, a good game of New Denver Bingo: We’re now “younger,” edgier” and no longer a cow town. (Chicago Tribune)

DeMarcus Ware: Super Bowl ring theft was an “inside job.”

The accused thieves worked at his home, he said. Sorry, not much more detail than that. (ABC7)

Hostel to open in Cap Hill.

The new owner paid $1.26 million for a century-old home to host the business. He already owns Drifter Jack’s in Austin. (BusinessDen)

Football fan is annoying.

Alen Troyer got lots of sweet retweets for riding around downtown in an Indian headdress costume. Also happening that day: An event commemorating the Sand Creek Massacre of hundreds of Arapaho and Cheyenne people in 1864. (Arrowhead Pride/Denverite)

A Line completely functional.

Yep. Apparently nobody had any trouble getting to DIA for Thanksgiving travels. It took me less than 50 minutes to get from the Union Station platform to my flight’s gate. Be not afraid. (9News)

Go cut down a Christmas tree.

You can do it for $10 in our Front Range national forests. (DP)

The garage is the entrepreneur’s canvas in Highland.

Latest example: Highlands United Methodist Church is turning an old mechanic’s shop into a community space. They’re trying to raised $400,000 for it. (North Denver Tribune)

Englewood wants startups and small businesses.

Previously, the city to our south had tried to attract big-box stores and apartment complexes with its business incentives. (DBJ)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.