Denver in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Oct. 6

16th Street used to cross the South Platte River on this viaduct, shown circa 1890s. The castle-looking building to the left is the present site of "Stoner Hill" in Commons Park. Union Station is behind it. (Denver Public Library/William Henry Jackson Collection/CHS.J41)

Let’s do the news. Today we’ve got elections, homelessness, Denver apartments and beer strategy.

Who’s trying to influence Colorado’s state elections?

Seriously: We don’t know. Anonymous fliers attacking Democrats have been making their way around suburban districts, with no “paid for” disclosures to be found. That’s not necessarily illegal, since they’re not explicitly urging votes one way or another. Still, this is an unusual appearance of “dark money” in local politics. (Colorado Independent)

Complaints about homelessness continue to rile Denver neighborhoods.

The story making the rounds today: An unnamed couple say they will sell their house west of City Park because of persistent homelessness in the neighborhood, including a couple that supposedly had sex near their house. Last week, the victim of the Ballpark bong attack told us his neighbors also were considering moving. (CBS, Denverite)

Denver apartments are still very valuable.

The Breakers Resort, a weirdly beachy looking place in southeast Denver, just sold for $350 million. That’s the highest price anyone has ever paid for a Denver multi-family project – and it shows that investors aren’t just interested in downtown. (BusinessDen)

It’s beer time.

I sure don’t have tickets to Great American Beer Festival, so I appreciated this huge calendar of unofficial events. Plus, everyone can benefit from Eric Gorski’s strategies for planning and surviving a night at the Super Bowl of beer. Meanwhile, Adrian Garcia has a good feature on what this massive event can do for a little business. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email