Denver homes near low-income housing actually rose in value, report says

In Denver, home values near low-income housing projects actually increased 2 percent, according to Trulia’s analysis.

Denver on an autumn day. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)residential real estate; skyline; cityscape; denver; colorado; weather; cowx; autumn; kevinjbeaty; denverite;
Denver on an autumn day. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) residential real estate; skyline; cityscape; denver; colorado; weather; cowx; autumn; kevinjbeaty; denverite;
Denver on an autumn day. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Look, if HBO has made a dramatic miniseries about it, you know it’s a thing. Generally, people have thought that low-income housing reduces nearby property values.

Not true, says Trulia.

In Denver, home values near those projects actually increased 2 percent, according to Trulia’s analysis of home values near projects funded through the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit. That’s after the projects were completed. (The study is aptly titled, “There doesn’t go the neighborhood.”)

Nationally, there was no impact in most of the 20 most expensive metropolitan areas. So, of course, there’s a caveat for Denver.

Some of that low-income housing was built in the area that would later become LoDo. In fact, low-income housing projects were concentrated in the Central Business District and Five Points too.

Trulia found that housing in neighborhoods with low-income projects actually outperformed the rest of the city. (Trulia)
Trulia found that housing in neighborhoods with low-income projects actually outperformed the rest of the city. (Trulia)

It’s by no means guaranteed that those projects will even remain affordable now that living near a city core is en vogue again. But pass along Trulia’s findings to a NIMBY in your life — just for fun.