Sunday night’s supermoon will be the closest a full moon has been to Earth since 1948

We’re in for another supermoon on Sunday and Monday nights, and this one is special.

A supermoon over Arizona in 2012, inferior in every way to the supermoon happening Nov. 13, 2016. (Ken Bosma/Flickr)
A supermoon over Arizona in 2012, inferior in every way to the supermoon happening Nov. 13, 2016. (Ken Bosma/Flickr)
A supermoon over Arizona in 2012, inferior in every way to the supermoon happening Nov. 13, 2016. (Ken Bosma/Flickr)

We’re in for another supermoon on Sunday night, and this one is special. It’ll be the closest a full moon has been to Earth in 68 years.

As the New York Times points out, you probably wouldn’t be able to tell the moon appears 7 percent larger and 15 percent brighter without being told so.

“There’s no fireworks show, no blinking sign that says, ‘Hey, this is the supermoon!’ ” Noah Petro, a deputy project scientist for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission, told the Times.

But don’t let the Gray Lady’s party pooper reporting get you down. The moon is going to be so close, you guys.

Equipped with knowledge of the moon’s temporary super-ness, you can gaze up at the sky and tell your friends that the moon is about 238,900 miles away from Earth on average, but during this supermoon, it’s about 221,524 miles away. They will be so impressed. Just write it on your arm if you have to.

The moon starts rising around 4:30 p.m., and as you probably already know, it always looks biggest on the horizon. Keep an eye out for the extra-super moon around 5 p.m.

Ashley Dean

Author: Ashley Dean

Ashley Dean covers dining and nightlife, and other odds and ends. She previously covered music and did some copy editing for the Denver Post, the Colorado Daily and the Daily Camera. She's from New York, likes her bourbon straight and has strong opinions about Kanye West. She can be reached at adean@denverite.com, 303-502-2804 or @AshleyDean.