Here’s why south Denver can’t have posh things: Freestanding ER crushes beer-garden dreams

The story of one piece of property illustrates one of the biggest challenges to reinventing places like Hampden Avenue or Colorado Boulevard.

Southmoor Park in Denver's Hampden South neighborhood, May 18, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; hampden south;
Southmoor Park in Denver’s Hampden South neighborhood, May 18, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The people of south Denver are pretty fired up.

They turn out by the hundreds for community meetings, many of them demanding sidewalks, restaurants and other amenities that often are missing in older neighborhoods far from the city’s center.

This year, though, they took a blow — and the story of one piece of property illustrates some of the biggest challenges to reinventing places like Hampden Avenue or Colorado Boulevard.


National Western construction is happening now, and Elyria-Swansea is already feeling change

“I tell people, why should I leave? Why can’t I make my neighborhood better?”

Elyria-Swansea, May 15, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; elyria swansea; development; gentrification;
Elyria-Swansea, May 15, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

David Trujillo paused for a moment from his work late one afternoon. He leaned against his pickup truck, loaded with logs and scrap that he had collected in his route through northeast Denver.

Here, at the edge of Elyria-Swansea, he saw the future: rows of orange construction cones and fences where the demolition crews had started their work. He was staring at the frontier, where the beginning of a huge city project met the edges of a neighborhood that has changed relatively little.

“It won’t be long,” he said. “I’ve been here 40-odd years.”


After criticism over a non-investigation of the mayor, Denver council considers new legal powers

“I can’t imagine Congress having to go to the president every time they need to hire an attorney.”

When the Denver City Council announced that it would not investigate Mayor Michael Hancock’s lascivious text messages with an employee, the condemnations poured in.

Kyle Clark, the local news anchor and prolific quipper, had a sizzler ready.



First Avenue Hotel is set to become affordable micro-apartments on Broadway — with millions in city help

The city of Denver is nearly ready to help a developer restore and expand the historic hotel property at 101 Broadway.

The First Avenue Hotel in August 1987, a good local example of Neo-Classicism. The large, four-story commercial building was originally designed for hotel, office and retail uses. It was designed by Charles Quayle and build by the owners, the Fleming Brothers, in 1907-1910. (History Colorado. Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation//Denver Public Library/Western History & Genealogy Dept./5DV53OAHP)
The First Avenue Hotel in August 1987. (History Colorado. Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation//Denver Public Library/Western History & Genealogy Dept./ 5DV53OAHP)

The old First Avenue Hotel on Broadway could see new life, five years after its last tenants were forced to abandon the historic building.

The future of the building has been up in the air since 2012, when city inspectors ordered everyone out of the building, saying the building was unsafe. Its last major tenants —   El Diablo and Sketch Food & Wine — shut their doors in 2013.

Now, the city is nearly ready to help restore and expand the property at 101 Broadway.