Denver’s ready to pay another $1 million to cover people’s bills. The first round ran out within months.

In the month of November, the city of Denver took more than 1,500 calls from people who needed help with their bills.

Some of them got it: Over the next four months, a new city program paid money for rent and utilities for close to 500 households.

And, soon enough, the program was out of money. But it’s now set to resume action later this month, with the Denver City Council on Monday approving another $1 million in funding.


Here’s why south Denver can’t have posh things: Freestanding ER crushes beer-garden dreams

The story of one piece of property illustrates one of the biggest challenges to reinventing places like Hampden Avenue or Colorado Boulevard.

Southmoor Park in Denver's Hampden South neighborhood, May 18, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; hampden south;
Southmoor Park in Denver’s Hampden South neighborhood, May 18, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The people of south Denver are pretty fired up.

They turn out by the hundreds for community meetings, many of them demanding sidewalks, restaurants and other amenities that often are missing in older neighborhoods far from the city’s center.

This year, though, they took a blow — and the story of one piece of property illustrates some of the biggest challenges to reinventing places like Hampden Avenue or Colorado Boulevard.


National Western construction is happening now, and Elyria-Swansea is already feeling change

“I tell people, why should I leave? Why can’t I make my neighborhood better?”

Elyria-Swansea, May 15, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; elyria swansea; development; gentrification;
Elyria-Swansea, May 15, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

David Trujillo paused for a moment from his work late one afternoon. He leaned against his pickup truck, loaded with logs and scrap that he had collected in his route through northeast Denver.

Here, at the edge of Elyria-Swansea, he saw the future: rows of orange construction cones and fences where the demolition crews had started their work. He was staring at the frontier, where the beginning of a huge city project met the edges of a neighborhood that has changed relatively little.

“It won’t be long,” he said. “I’ve been here 40-odd years.”


After criticism over a non-investigation of the mayor, Denver council considers new legal powers

“I can’t imagine Congress having to go to the president every time they need to hire an attorney.”

When the Denver City Council announced that it would not investigate Mayor Michael Hancock’s lascivious text messages with an employee, the condemnations poured in.

Kyle Clark, the local news anchor and prolific quipper, had a sizzler ready.