As pot legalization spreads, women are working to crack the “grass” ceiling

One Colorado woman advocates training for skills like business-plan writing for those wanting to shift from the black market to legal market, and increased mentorship.

By Becky Bohrer, Associated Press

JUNEAU, Alaska — When Danielle Schumacher attended her first convention of marijuana activists about 15 years ago, she could count on one hand all the women in a room of older men.

The lack of diversity struck the then-college student, who remembers feeling out of place but also determined to make her mark.

“That feeling just really stuck with me that this isn’t going to last. This is going to shift in my lifetime, and I want to be part of that,” said the San Francisco-based Schumacher, who in 2014 co-founded THC Staffing Group, a recruitment firm that encourages a more diverse cannabis industry workforce.

As marijuana has become more mainstream, Schumacher has seen a gradual shift, with more women working in the industry. Women-centric groups focused on networking or providing a space for women curious about cannabis have proliferated, too.



“They just really stand out”: Why an interrogation of Native American students at CSU was all too typical

The teenage brothers — both shy and Native American — had just entered a recreation center on a tour of their dream university when a parent in the group stepped away to call 911.

By Mary Hudetz, Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The teenage brothers — both shy and Native American — had just entered a recreation center on a tour of their dream university when a parent in the group stepped away to call 911.

“Their behavior is just really odd,” she said from the Colorado State University campus. “They won’t give their names …. They just really stand out.”

The teens’ quiet disposition and dark clothing were unnerving, the caller told the dispatcher. Campus police responded by pulling them from the tour, patting them down and asking why they didn’t “cooperate” when others asked them questions.

Yet for many Native Americans, much of 17-year-old Lloyd Skanahwati and 19-year-old Thomas Kanewakeron Gray’s reserved conduct followed cultural norms often expected of youth — especially those taught in their schools and communities to be humble, as well as thoughtful about how and when to draw attention to themselves.


Colorado lawmakers conclude 2018 session with pension deal

Lawmakers narrowly passed an ambitious plan to rescue the state pension fund from the fiscal brink.

The Colorado State Capitol, Feb. 14, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; capitol building; gold dome;
The Colorado State Capitol, Feb. 14, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Brian Eason and James Anderson, Associated Press

Colorado lawmakers narrowly passed an ambitious plan to rescue the state pension fund from the fiscal brink just minutes before the 2018 legislative session gaveled to a close at midnight Wednesday.

After daylong negotiations, Gov. John Hickenlooper lobbied fellow Democrats to pass the bill at a moment when their support appeared to be wavering. Opposition from the state’s largest teachers union threatened to unravel the deal reached with Senate Republicans.


Fire destroys 2 buildings under construction in Denver

The fire was reported around 1:55 a.m. at 1930 Grove St., just off Federal Boulevard near Mile High Stadium.

The Denver Fire department sprays water on a construction site that burned down at 1930 Grove Street, May 10, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; firefighting; fire; construction;
The Denver Fire department sprays water on a construction site that burned down at 1930 Grove Street, May 10, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

A fire has destroyed two residential buildings under construction in Denver.

The fire was reported around 1:55 a.m. at 1930 Grove St., just off Federal Boulevard near Mile High Stadium, the Denver Post reported.