Challengers claim victories in Denver teachers union elections, race for president heading for recount

A slate of progressive, social justice-oriented candidates won a majority of seats up for grabs in the Denver teachers union election.

By Eric GorskiChalkbeat 

A slate of progressive, social justice-oriented candidates won a majority of seats up for grabs in the Denver teachers union election, and the race for president is headed for a recount, according to results released to union members Friday.

Denver Classroom Teachers Association president Henry Roman edged challenger Tommie Shimrock, the leader of the slate, 906 to 857, according to an email from the union obtained by Chalkbeat.

The margin is within the 3 percent threshold for an automatic recount, which will be held after Denver Public Schools returns from spring break April 3, the email said.


Traffic pollution: an invisible health risk for dozens of Denver schools

Rush hour traffic merges onto I-70 just beyond Swansea Elementary. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)
Rush hour traffic merges onto I-70 just beyond Swansea Elementary. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Ann SchimkeChalkbeat

Just a few hundred feet from the front doors of Highline Academy Charter School’s southeast Denver campus is Interstate 25, where more than 200,000 vehicles rush by each day.

At Swansea Elementary School in north Denver, kids frolic near the busy Interstate 70 overpass that abuts the playground. Three miles west, at a charter school called STRIVE Prep – Sunnyside, the same highway looms just past a chain link fence next to the school.


Lack of transportation options means school “choice” is illusory for many Denver families

Six years after Denver Public Schools created an innovative bus shuttle system to help get students to school, the larger problem it sought to fix remains.

The sun rises over Denver, as seen from Denver Public Schools' Hilltop Bus Terminal, the mothership of their daily logistics operation. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) sunrise; cityscape; skyline; school bus; denverite; kevinjbeaty; denver; colorado;
The sun rises over Denver, as seen from Denver Public Schools’ Hilltop Bus Terminal, the mothership of their daily logistics operation. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Yesenia Robles, Chalkbeat

Six years after Denver Public Schools created an innovative bus shuttle system to help get students to school, the effort has expanded and evolved but the larger problem it sought to fix remains.

The system, called the Success Express, was introduced in 2011 in northeast Denver with the goal of helping families choose high-quality schools as the district was changing the choice process and overhauling low-performing schools in the far northeast part of the city.


How the heck does Colorado fund its schools? (And six other money questions you might be embarrassed to ask.)

Since public schools were founded, arguments have raged over how to pay for them. In Colorado, it’s one of the perennial debates.

A high school student at Vista Peak Preparatory works on a computer during an engineering class. (Nicholas Garcia/Chalkbeat)
A high school student at Vista Peak Preparatory works on a computer during an engineering class. (Nicholas Garcia/Chalkbeat)

By Nicholas GarciaChalkbeat 

Since public schools were founded, arguments have raged over how to pay for them.

In Colorado, it’s one of the perennial debates that gets the best of lawmakers, lobbyists, school leaders and advocates every year. Further frustrating things, lawmakers can only do so much because constitutional amendments lock in much of the state’s budget.


How Denver Public Schools wants to drive a conversation about creating more integrated schools

The school board on Thursday approved a “Resolution for Strengthening Neighborhoods.”

East High school and a crane. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) development; construction; city park; denver; denverite; colorado; winter; kevinjbeaty;
East High school and a crane. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Eric GorskiChalkbeat 

Denver Public Schools is pledging to start a conversation about gentrification and spiraling housing costs in the city, hoping to use the results to create more integrated schools.

The school board on Thursday approved a “Resolution for Strengthening Neighborhoods.” It calls for forming a citywide committee to study those demographic shifts, which are driving a major reduction in the number of school-age children in many neighborhoods.