Colorado GOP Rep. Phil Covarrubias defends Japanese internment as the type of thing that happens “in the heat of combat”

“When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and all of that was going on, there’s no time to ask questions,” Covarrubias said in debate over the Ralph Carr Freedom Defense Act.

State Rep. Phil Covarrubias, a Brighton Republican, defended the policy of sending Japanese-American people to concentration camps during World War II during debate Wednesday about the Ralph Carr Freedom Defense Act.

This bill would prohibit Colorado from helping the federal government create ethnically and religiously based registries or internment camps and from providing information about the immigration status of any Colorado resident unless it was “for a legal and constitutional purpose.” It’s named after the Republican governor of Colorado who opposed Japanese internment.


Here’s how ICE is going to name and shame cities like Denver that don’t cooperate with immigration enforcement

Denver is on the list, as are Boulder, Broomfield and Weld counties.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement has issued its first report on “declined detainers,” a list of times that they asked local law enforcement to hold onto a suspected illegal immigrant in their custody but the agency didn’t comply.

Denver is on it, as are Boulder, Broomfield and Weld counties, which is not surprising because Colorado sheriffs generally don’t honor these detainers ever since Arapahoe County had to pay damages to a domestic violence victim who was held for ICE even after criminal charges against her were dismissed. (The ACLU of Colorado sent a helpful letter drawing the attention of the state’s sheriffs to that case.) 


What if requiring more parking for new development in Denver leads to more big, boxy developments?

Denver City Council has extended its parking debate for at least two more meetings as Councilman Jolon Clark held back on a key amendment.

The parking lot of the Denver Coliseum near Globeville Landing. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)
Maybe this is enough parking for all the new development in Denver. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

Let’s say you’re building a five-story building on a small lot in a mixed-use zone, which is a thing a developer might want to do in Denver. How many parking spaces should you have to provide on the site? Six? Nine? 16? 24? Why should existing residents have to make room for all those new cars on city streets? What if requiring that much parking led you to assemble a few lots and build even bigger than before?

These are the questions the Denver City Council is trying to answer in its debate over the small-lot parking exemption, a debate that will continue through at least two more meetings. Councilman Jolon Clark held back Monday on introducing his most contentious amendment to a proposal that came out of a working group late last year and that is backed by Council President Albus Brooks.


U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet says Neil Gorsuch deserves the fair hearing Merrick Garland was denied

U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet directly addressed the elephant in the room: the widespread belief among Democrats that the open seat created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia was stolen from them.

In his introduction of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Senate Judiciary Committee, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet directly addressed the elephant in the room: the widespread belief among Democrats that the open seat created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia was stolen from them when Senate Republicans denied a hearing to President Barack Obama’s nominee, Judge Merrick Garland.

“Two wrongs don’t make a right,” he said in urging his colleagues to give a fair hearing and a vote to Gorsuch, even though Democrats still have the ability to filibuster Supreme Court nominees and are under pressure from their base to obstruct the president’s agenda at every opportunity.