When you write legislation really quickly, sometimes you accidentally cut funding for buses and museums

This goes back to Senate Bill 267, which neglected to mention Colorado’s special districts like RTD and SCFD when it tinkered with the marijuana tax rate.

State representatives applaud after Senate Bill 17-267, Sustainability Of Rural Colorado, was passed on the last day of the legislative session, May 10, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) copolitics; house of representatives; politics; capitol; kevinjbeaty; denver; denverite; colorado;
State representatives applaud after Senate Bill 17-267, Sustainability Of Rural Colorado, was passed on the last day of the legislative session, May 10, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The Regional Transportation District, the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District and districts that fund housing and public health in rural counties are all missing money this year because legislative fiddling with the marijuana tax rate failed to take them into account.


Compromise on ICE bill wins over a Denver City Council member

Councilman Kevin Flynn voted against the first version of a bill to limit Denver’s cooperation with immigration authorities when it was at committee, but on Monday night, he said changes to the bill allow him to vote yes.

Councilman Kevin Flynn voted against the first version of a bill to limit Denver’s cooperation with immigration authorities when it was at committee, but on Monday night, he said changes to the bill allow him to vote yes.

The Denver City Council moved forward the Public Safety Enforcement Priorities Act with no opposition. A one-hour public hearing is scheduled for next Monday, Aug. 28, along with a final vote on the bill.


Colorado’s faithless elector gets away with it, leaving Wayne Williams shaking his fist

Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman said she would not file charges in the case.

Electors Polly Baca, Anne Hallman, Robert Nemanich and Micheal Baca take their oaths in Governor Hickenlooper's office at the Colorado Capitol. (Chloe Aiello/Denverite)
Electors Polly Baca (left to right), Anne Hallman, Robert Nemanich and Micheal Baca take their oaths in Governor John Hickenlooper’s office at the Colorado Capitol. (Chloe Aiello/Denverite)

Remember when a couple Democratic electors in Colorado were going to change the outcome of the presidential election by refusing to vote for Hillary Clinton, in hopes of inspiring Republican electors not to vote for Donald Trump, hence sparing the nation a president who looks directly into the sun during a solar eclipse?

Yeah, that happened.


After DIA deal, Denver mayor’s office seeks buy-in for more public-private partnerships

The $1.8B public-private partnership to renovate the Great Hall at Denver International Airport likely will be just the first such deal that Denver enters into.

Security lines at DIA. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) dia; denver international airport; tsa; security; lines; denver; denverite; colorado; kevinjbeaty
Security lines at DIA. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The $1.8 billion public-private partnership to renovate the Great Hall at Denver International Airport likely will be just the first such deal that Denver enters into as the city seeks to rehabilitate aging facilities and infrastructure or complete major redevelopment projects.

As we reported earlier, the office of Mayor Michael Hancock wants to create an Office of Public-Private Partnerships to vet and coordinate such projects, with the National Western Center and the Denver Center for the Performing Arts two likely prospects in the relatively near future.


Denver “won’t be bullied or blackmailed,” mayor says as city officials propose limiting cooperation with ICE

Mayor Michael Hancock, Denver City Council members and immigrant advocates have united behind an ordinance that would give force of law to city policies.

City council members Robin Kneich (left to right) and Paul Lopez and Mayor Michael Hancock at a press conference on actions that will limit the city’s cooperation with federal immigration authorities, Aug. 16, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)
City Council members Robin Kneich (left to right) and Paul López and Mayor Michael Hancock announce a unified approach on limiting city cooperation with federal immigration authorities, Aug. 16, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Mayor Michael Hancock, Denver City Council members and immigrant advocates have united behind a new version of an ordinance that would give force of law to existing city policies that limit cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

The bill retains the ability of the Denver Sheriff’s Department to notify Immigration and Customs Enforcement when certain inmates are released from the Denver jail — a point of contention between Hancock and council members Robin Kniech and Paul López in an earlier version of the bill — but it adds in requirements to also notify those immigrant inmates that ICE wants to talk to them and advise them of their rights.

Hancock and City Council members described the actions of the Trump administration as a crucible that have forced them to examine and refine their values and turn them into action. This ordinance reflects that.