Denver native Marshall Fogel has one of the most prolific baseball memorabilia collections, and you can see it now

Baseball bats on display in the "Play Ball!" exhibit at the History Colorado Center, April 24, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) history colorado; denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
Baseball bats loaned by Marshall Fogel on display inside “Play Ball!,” an exhibit at the History Colorado Center, April 24, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The year was 1989 and Marshall Fogel, lifelong Denver resident and local lawyer, was visiting Chicago when he wandered into a massive sports convention.

“God,” he said, “it was like walking in heaven.”

He picked up a few baseball items and, soon, his love affair with relics of the game had become more than a hobby.

In the years following, Fogel amassed a collection that’s become perhaps the most complete (and valuable) in the country. Now, many of his prized photographs, tickets, bats and gloves are on display in the History Colorado Center’s exhibit “Play Ball!” It celebrates the history of the game in honor of the Rockies’ 25th season.


Chasing equity, Colorado Sikhs get their faith added to a list of religions that could be taught in school

Observers of Sikhism in the Denver area have been campaigning for years for their religion to be recognized as a tradition distinct from any other.

Karanpreet Singh holds up an American flag. The second-annual Sikh festival at East High School, May 28, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) sikh; colorado singh sabha; east high school; denver; colorado; parade; kevinjbeaty; denverite;
Karanpreet Singh holds up an American flag during the second-annual Sikh festival at East High School, May 28, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Observers of Sikhism in the Denver area have been campaigning for years for their religion to be recognized as a tradition distinct from any other. Their motivation came in the wake of 9/11, when Sikhs were among those targeted in an uptick of hate crimes. Fearing violence, community leaders in Denver have been pursuing education as a means of dispelling ignorance and fostering better relationships with the community at large.

Part of that effort was a lobby to add Sikhism to the Colorado Department of Education’s social studies standards, a list of world faiths that could be taught in Colorado schools. Last week, as part of sweeping revisions to the state standards, the department approved that addition.


Skeptical of college, concerned about gentrification, one recent Denver grad tries to take matters into his own hands

“It’s not just construction, it’s also fighting for what’s right at the same time and doing it in a peaceful manner.”

Elijah Beauford graduates from Construction Careers Now, Dec. 14, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; construction; development;
Elijah Beauford graduates from Construction Careers Now, Dec. 14, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

It’s graduation night in a sleepy warehouse tucked beneath Interstate 70 and Elijah Beauford is feeling proud as he walks to the front of the room to receive a certificate and congratulatory handshakes.

Here in this warehouse, tonight’s graduation is not from an esteemed college. Instead, his certificate honors completion at Construction Careers Now, a free, month-long program aimed at funneling new recruits into an industry facing a worker shortage.

While many of his fellow graduates will soon hit the clock on one of Denver’s many job sites, Beauford’s set on an unusual trajectory. His first project is a remodel of his father’s house, a brick bungalow less than a block from City Park Golf Course. It’s long been a home for young men who might otherwise be on the street.

His new skills serve more than a career path. Stripping paint and fixing his father’s old wooden floors is a way to put his community’s future in his own hands.


Activists have raised more than $20,000 to bail out women in jail in time for Mother’s Day

A combined effort by the Denver Justice Project and Black Lives Matter 5280 have stepped up a new tradition aimed at ending cash bonds.

Elisabeth Epps helps Tisihia Morris call her mother after she was released from the Douglas County Jail in Castle Rock as part of a grassroots Mother's Day action backed by Black Lives Matter 5280 and the Denver Justice Project, May 10, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; jail; black lives matter; bail; criminal justice; castle rock; douglas county;
Elisabeth Epps helps Tisihia Morris call her mother after she was bailed out from the Douglas County Jail in Castle Rock. Her release was part of a grassroots Mother’s Day action backed by Black Lives Matter 5280 and the Denver Justice Project, May 10, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

On Thursday morning, Elisabeth Epps walked into the Douglas County Justice Center with cash on hand and began to bail women out of jail. After a few hours of waiting, the first emerged. Tisihia Morris, who was released on a $1,000 bail, stepped happily out of the elevator with a plastic bag full of her belongings.

“Guess what?” she said, calling her mother. “I’m out!”


Denverite events come in many flavors — come hang out!

Denverite events are one of the best ways you can make connections with the issues you care about — and friends you haven’t made yet.

Animated portraits of guests at Denverite's February member event at Understudy Denver, Feb. 13, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denverite event;
Animated portraits of guests at Denverite’s February member event at Understudy Denver, Feb. 13, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Denverite is all about helping you better engage with your city, and Denverite events are one of the best ways you can make connections with the issues you care about — and friends you haven’t made yet.

Here’s what’s in store for the near future, plus recaps of past events: