Denver’s once-in-a-decade GO Bond transportation vision, explained

Which modes reign supreme in Denver’s 2017 GO Bond package? Here’s a breakdown of how biking, walking, pedestrian and vehicular interests fared.

A view of the Denver skyline from 38th and Blake on June 22, 2017. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite) rino; river north; light rail; freight; downtown; mountains; sunset
A view of the Denver skyline from 38th and Blake on June 22, 2017. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

By now, you’ve probably heard that roughly half of Denver’s $937 million, once-in-a-decade bond funds are earmarked for transportation projects. And if you’ve heard anything about Mayor Michael Hancock’s vision for the city, it’s probably that he’s working towards a multimodal city.

But which modes reign supreme in Denver’s vision for the transportation future? Here’s a breakdown of how biking, walking, pedestrian and vehicular interests fared in the transportation bond proposal. 


$2.8 million grant will help 130 Denver homes with lead abatement

Here’s what it takes to for a Denver home to qualify for the program.

If you have a child, and your home was built before 1970 and housing costs are hard to afford, Denver might be able to help you make sure there’s no dangerous lead in your home.

The city won a $2.8 million grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development to help 130 local low- and moderate-income homes with lead abatement, the Denver Department of Environmental Health announced Monday. 


5 Denver homes that sold way over list price last week: July 23 edition

Last week, 42 percent of the people who bought a home paid more than its asking price. The differences ranged from $100 extra to a full $200,000 more.

The exterior of 85 Uinta Way, unit #406. (Courtesy of Redfin)
The exterior of 85 Uinta Way, unit #406. (Courtesy of Redfin)

Sure, there’s a balance to the number of people that pay over list price and under in Denver.

But it turns out that overbids for single family home are more common so far this year, although by a small margin.


East Colfax’s Detroit Terraces are efficiency units without extra amenities

Detroit Terraces, 1530 Detroit St. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; kevinjbeaty; denverite; colfax; development; residential real estate;
Detroit Terraces, 1530 Detroit St. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Most of the time, when you hear about smaller units in Denver, they seem to be downtown. But in East Colfax, the 50 units of Detroit Terraces have an average 540 square feet each.

Developer Brian Toerber, president of Inspire Investment Group, says with an already small building, he knew the finished product would have to draw on the neighborhood’s charm.