Colorado breweries first in state to reduce, rebrew, recycle

Three Front Range breweries are entering uncharted waters this month, taking 330 gallons of previously used water and turning it into beer.

On Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017 direct potable reuse (DPR) purified water will be delivered to three breweries earmarked to become Coloradoís first to produce craft beer from recycled water. (Courtesy of CH2M)
On Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017 direct potable reuse (DPR) purified water will be delivered to three breweries earmarked to become Coloradoís first to produce craft beer from recycled water. (Courtesy of CH2M)
On Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, direct potable reuse (DPR) purified water will be delivered to three breweries earmarked to become Colorado’s first to produce craft beer from recycled water. (Courtesy of CH2M)

Three Front Range breweries are entering uncharted waters this month, taking 330 gallons of previously used water and turning it into beer.

The breweries in Castle Rock, Centennial and Lone Tree are partnering with CH2M to highlight how direct potable reuse, or DPR, purified water is a viable option for water conservation. The engineering firm plans to serve the beer Oct. 13 during a private event at its headquarters in Englewood.

Breweries in Arizona and Oregon have used DPR water before, but this month will be the first time Colorado brewers are using the technology, according to CH2M.

“By applying this technology to something our state loves — local craft beer — we’re highlighting the positive impacts recycled water can have in communities and helping build public support for similar initiatives,” said Larry Schimmoller, CH2M reuse technology director, in a statement.

CH2M is partnering with 105 West Brewing Co., Lone Tree Brewing Co. and Lost Highway Brewing Co. for the project. The water comes from a treatment plant in Pima County, Arizona.

“On average, it takes 60 ounces of water to brew just 12 ounces of beer, something our customers probably don’t realize when they reach for that beer bottle,” said Tina Pachorek, CEO Lost Highway Brewing Co.

“With water under increasing demand, we want to do our part to build a sustainable future, and that’s why we excitedly accepted this opportunity with CH2M,” Pachorek said in a statement.

CH2M was named the Stockholm Industry Award winner for transforming the practice and perception of wastewater in 2015. The company has challenged the idea that just because water has been used, it has to be wasted.

“It’s our hope, and the hope of our partner breweries, that when our guests get a taste of these special batches of ReuseFest beer, their perceptions of water reuse will change for the better as they simply enjoy a great tasting beer,” Schimmoller said.

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Business & data reporter Adrian D. Garcia can be reached via email at agarcia@denverite.com or twitter.com/adriandgarcia.

Adrian D. Garcia

Author: Adrian D. Garcia

Adrian D. Garcia is on business and trends for Denverite, serves as treasurer for the Colorado chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and on the board of the Denver Press Club. He can be reached at agarcia@denverite.com.