Colorado electronic open records bill gets another hearing

A bill to modernize Colorado’s Open Records Act is being considered by a Senate committee that killed the idea over security concerns last year.

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DENVER (AP) — A bill to modernize Colorado’s Open Records Act is being considered by a Senate committee that killed the idea over security concerns last year.

Democratic Sen. John Kefalas’ bill would allow citizens to more easily analyze public documents by requiring state agencies to provide them in their original, computer-friendly electronic formats.

There are exceptions, such as when an agency doesn’t have the technical know-how to do so.

More than 15 states and the federal government have made it easier for the public to obtain computerized data that can include crime statistics, budgets or salaries.

The Senate State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee hears testimony on the bill Wednesday.

It rejected a similar bill last year. Among other concerns, lawmakers wanted to ensure that sensitive information, such as Social Security numbers, could be permanently deleted from digital data.