Denver in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Aug. 1

Ferris Cassius, the proprietor of City Park Sundries, draws a soda at his business at 2101 York Street in 1976. (Thomas Noel/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. Today’s news roundup includes the final word on Denver’s next music festival, a new urban district for Stapleton, the rescue operation on the South Platte last night and more.

Ferris Cassius, the proprietor of City Park Sundries, draws a soda at his business at 2101 York Street in 1976. (Thomas Noel/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Ferris Cassius, the proprietor of City Park Sundries, draws a soda at his business at 2101 York Street in 1976. (Thomas Noel/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Music festival:

The Denver City Council has approved a contract for the Overland Golf Course music festival. It allows for the event to run from 2018 to 2022, bringing up to 80,000 people annually. Joseph reports. (Denverite)

Marijuana club:

The pot club formerly known as iBake in Englewood remains shut down after losing the latest legal round. (CBS4; autoplay ads)

Stapleton’s next step?

The developer of Stapleton is shopping around early ideas for offices, condos, apartments, retail and a grocery store around Central Park Station. (Front Porch)

Politics:

Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne is probably running for governor. She’s still officially “not sure,” but she’s also starting her campaign. (DP)

Your rights:

Starting Aug. 9, it will no longer be a crime for public employees and officials to “willfully and knowingly” break the rules of the Colorado Open Records Act. That means that if someone fails to provide public records as required, you’ll have to sue them instead. No government official had ever been criminally charged for withholding public records. (Independent)

Denver’s next water war:

Denver Water is preparing to spend $360 million to divert more water from the Colorado River watershed for use on the Front Range. Environmentalists may challenge the project in court, arguing that climate change will soon shrink the Colorado River and nullify the current agreements about the river. They want to see more conservation and cooperation instead, as Bob Berwyn reports. (High Country)

Search and rescue:

Rescue teams canvassed the South Platte River for an hour last night after two men were seen entering the water around midnight. One was rescued but the other is reported dead. (Denverite)

Where reporters hang out:

The Denver Press Club is 150 years old, and it’s celebrating with a party and a historic designation for its sweet old clubhouse. (Denverite)

Weekend trips:
Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.