Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, April 24

We’ve got news on the weed boom, a dying language, a good sign for Colorado conservationists and more.

16th Street circa 1911, with the rise of the viaduct visible in the background. (Louis Charles McClure/Western History and Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hello. Ski season is nearly over, but at least we have a good chance of some some storms this week. (Wednesday’s supposed to be good, and this weekend.) Here in the real world, we’ve got news on the weed boom, a dying language, a good sign for Colorado conservationists and more.

16th Street circa 1911, with the rise of the viaduct visible in the background. (Louis Charles McClure/Western History and Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
16th Street circa 1911, with the rise of the viaduct visible in the background. (Louis Charles McClure/Western History and Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Marijuana: Still popular.

Recreational sales revenues for this year in Colorado are up 38 percent over last year even while wholesale prices are bottoming out, as Eli McVey reports for Marijuana Business Daily. (MBD)

The Arapaho language:

The Arapaho people lived in Boulder when white settlers arrived. The community still has thousands of people, but only a few dozen fluently speak the Arapaho language and most of them are older than 70. Here’s how their language might be preserved, as Kevin Simpson reports. (DP)

Drilling deferred:

The Trump administration previously proposed to sell oil and gas leases near Rocky Mountain National Park in Grand County. After pushback, the June 8 auction of drilling rights will not include the Grand County parcels. “The decision to withhold 27,000 acres in Grand County, Colorado, from a BLM lease sale was an unexpected victory for conservation after the torrent of pro-fossil fuel policy moves announced by the Trump administration,” as Elizabeth Shogren reports. (High Country News)

What’s it like in those crazy houses?

The Modern Home Tour returns to Denver on Saturday, May 20. Tickets are $35 in advance, as Ken Shallcross reports. (North Denver Tribune)

Earthquake:

A 3.5 magnitude earthquake “felt like an explosion” in Rangely on the Western Slope, as Jesse Paul reports. The U.S. Geological Survey can’t say whether or not this earthquake was caused by drilling operations. (DP)

Stolen bell:

A big bell went missing from Colorado State University for, oh, say, a century. Turns out a frat had it! CSU doesn’t know which one. All’s well that ends well? (CSU)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.