Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Aug. 10

A funeral procession through Central City, likely during the 1890 and possibly for Sheriff R.B. Williams, who was shot by a quartz hauler. (Donald Campbell Kemp/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/K-283)

Hi. Here’s your daily slice of life, including some fun stuff, some reporting on local police, new development and more. As always, say hi.

A funeral procession through Central City, likely during the 1890 and possibly for Sheriff R.B. Williams, who was shot by a quartz hauler. (Donald Campbell Kemp/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/K-283)
A funeral procession through Central City, likely during the 1890s and possibly for Sheriff R.B. Williams, who was shot by a quartz hauler. (Donald Campbell Kemp/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/K-283)

Storms:

Today’s got higher potential for thunderstorms, so pack a raincoat and stay low. This weekend’s looking more clear. (Denverite)

Fun stuff:

Paul Karolyi has a list of novel Colorado restaurants to show your out-of-town friends. Fun stuff for those of us who live here, too. (Eater)

It’s football (pre)season. Christian will get you up to speed on what those Bronco boys are lacking.

It’s also sunflower season. DIA has thousands of acres of agricultural fields, including a ton of sunflowers. Here’s the deal.

These are the oldest businesses and organizations in Denver. (Denverite)

Data for cops:

The city auditor finds that the Denver Police Department didn’t do the best job of rolling out its data-driven policing program. The downtown district has dropped the initiative entirely, as Ben Markus reports. (Colorado Public Radio)

Mildly related: Reuters reports the “hype is fading” for programming boot-camps. The issue seems to be that they’re not making enough money, despite growing enrollment. Some of the startups — including Galvanize, where Denverite is based — are trying to grow revenue by focusing on corporate training instead. (Reuters via NYT)

Bikes and peds:

Arapahoe County wants your input on a new bike-trail plan, as Kara Mason reports. There are more than 500 projects in the proposal. (Sentinel)

Development & housing:

Revesco is building a $2 million office project for two businesses at Tejon and 17th, according to Amy DiPierro. (BusinessDen)

A nonprofit and the federal housing department want the federal government to use 59 acres in Lakewood for housing and housing assistance near the W Line. They have convinced a judge to temporarily delay the auction of the land, as Monica Mendoza reports. (DBJ)

The latest from Megan: RTD and Denver are working on affordable housing for Five Points. Tennyson Street now has its very own micro-studios. (Denverite)

Environment:

The emerald ash borer was found in a tree in Lafayette. It’s the fourth place the invasive bug has been found in Colorado. It has not reached down to Denver yet, as Anthony Hahn reports. (Camera)

New plans from the Interior Department could “make it easier for ranchers and energy companies to move into sagebrush habitat that’s now off limits.” The sagebrush is home to the sage-grouse, a large and odd bird that has some federal protections. (Inside Energy)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.