Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Aug. 3

The tracks of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad follow the bends of the Colorado River in Bond, Colorado, in Eagle County. (E.T. Bollinger collection/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. The news today includes the retrospective on Dinger you didn’t know you needed, some exciting A Line stuff, a load of politics and more. Read!

The tracks of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad follow the bends of the Colorado River in Bond, Colorado, in Eagle County. (E.T. Bollinger collection/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
The tracks of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad follow the bends of the Colorado River in Bond, Colorado, in Eagle County. (E.T. Bollinger collection/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Dinger:

Let’s start with the most important fact I’ve learned today: Dinger the Rockies Dinosaur emerged naked from a giant styrofoam egg on his first day at Coors Field in 1995. Christian goes deep. (Denverite)

A Line? May be.

RTD told the feds that they’re really pretty sure they fixed the A Line, based on recent tests. The feds haven’t certified the fix yet, but this could be good news for the delayed G Line too, as Megan reports. (Denverite)

Politics:

U.S. Rep. Jared Polis is calling for 100 percent renewable energy sources for Colorado by 2040. It’s a plank in his run for governor. (PostIndependent)

Walker Stapleton, the Republican state treasurer, isn’t officially running for governor, but it’s looking very likely. Mark Matthews argues that the delay is a tactic to get around fundraising limits. Right now, Stapleton is raising money for an “independent expenditure committee” — a super PAC, basically — which he wouldn’t be allowed to do once he’s officially running. (DP)

Sen. Cory Gardner is going to “continue to work to repair the damage of Obamacare,” but he didn’t get specific, Jesse Paul reports. (DP)

Denver vs. ICE:

The Denver City Council is set for a debate on a law that would strictly limit cooperation with immigration authorities. The mayor has introduced a similar measure of his own. Here’s how the early debate is shaping up. (Denverite)

Jefferson County’s next highway:

Jefferson County governments are moving forward with a plan to build a 10-mile toll road connecting Highway 93 near Arvada and Golden to Highway 128 in Broomfield, as Christy Steadman reports. Here’s a map. It would complete a bigger loop around the metro, which also includes C-470, E-470 and the Northwest Parkway. (Golden Transcript)

Beer and drugs:

Many drug dogs are not able to tell you whether they’re smelling weed or, say, ecstasy. That fact led the Colorado Court of Appeals to overturn a meth possession conviction that resulted from a drug dog search. Sam Brasch explains why, and how it’s affecting Colorado’s drug dogs. (CPR)

Law enforcement issued more citations at Red Rock’s dance music concerts than any other genre. Here’s Adrian with the expert analysis. (Denverite)

ICYMI:

Denver Post has started a series on the divide between rural and urban Colorado. (DP)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.