Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Feb. 22

Flood waters near the 23rd Street viaduct in Lower Downtown, Denver, in 1933. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library

Hi. Today’s news roundup covers a controversy brewing in City Hall, some interesting political debates and more.

Flood waters near the 23rd Street viaduct in Lower Downtown, Denver, in 1933. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library
Flood waters near the 23rd Street viaduct in Lower Downtown, Denver, in 1933. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library

Justice:

Lisa Calderón says the Community Reentry Project lost its contract with the city because she criticized Mayor Michael Hancock. The mayor’s office says it was simply part of a competitive bidding process. And for more than 60 days, people leaving jail have had to find services elsewhere. (Denverite)

The state encourages probation officers to help immigration agents arrest their clients. Allison Sherry reports. (CPR)

Development:

Denver’s suburbs are building closer to small airports — which the airports and the FAA don’t love. John Aguilar reports. (DP)

Education:

Thirteen schools want to join Denver Public Schools’ “innovation zone” or form their own zones, moves that would make them more autonomous. Melanie Asmar reports. (Chalkbeat)

 

Democrats rejected a proposal to allow concealed guns in schools. John Herrick reports. (Independent)

Transportation:

If you’re looking for a cheap way to get around, one that involves walking several blocks to a pickup point and riding with other people in a vehicle, Uber has a service for you, Denver. Ashley on the beat. (Denverite)

A bill to legalize the “Idaho Stop” — in which a bicyclist doesn’t have to stop at stop signs — passed the Colorado Senate. Now it’ll go to the House. Marianne Goodland reports. (Colorado Politics)

 

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.