Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Feb. 23

Japanese men arrive from the Merced Assembly Center, California, by train, carrying suitcases and boarding school buses on their way to the Camp Amache internment zone in Colorado, Aug. 28, 1942. (Tom Parker/War Relocation Authority/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)

Hey everyone, sorry this is late today. I was out past midnight covering a rather tense hearing on sanctuary cities. Also in the roundup: an “unconstitutional” Denver policy, the future of the Golden Triangle and more.

Japanese men arrive from the Merced Assembly Center, California, by train, carrying suitcases and boarding school buses on their way to the Camp Amache internment zone in Colorado, Aug. 28, 1942. (Tom Parker/War Relocation Authority/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)
Japanese men arrive from California in Granada, Colorado on their way to the Camp Amache internment zone, Aug. 28, 1942. More on internment’s effect in Colorado here. (Tom Parker/War Relocation Authority/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)

Sanctuary cities just survived one local threat:

Last night’s hearing brought hours of testimony from two different sets of people who believe, for very different reasons, that immigration policy has caused tragedies in their lives and communities. Lawmakers ultimately shut down the bill in question, which aimed to punish “sanctuary cities,” but the testimony showed me a bigger, looming question: What happens when ICE tries to force local cooperation on immigration? Also, someone played a clarinet for the committee at 11 p.m. (Denverite)

Judge says parks bans unconstitutional:

Denver has to decide soon whether police officers will still be allowed to ban suspected drugs users from parks with zero notice. New factor shaping that decision: A county judge has agreed with the ACLU that the policy is unconstitutional, as I reported. (Denverite)

In other city news, Councilman Rafael Espinoza explains to Erica why he wants to join the lawsuit against the city’s flood-control project, and why the city doesn’t like that. (Denverite)

Meet Denver’s director of cultural affairs:

“Everything we do must have diversity, inclusiveness and equity as a lens — not just in the programming, but in the decision-making processes. That means I’m looking at every single program: How was it developed? How do you determine what the program is about? Does it have a commitment to community building and social change?” as Tariana Navas-Nieves tells Laura Bond. (Confluence)

The future of Golden Triangle in renderings:

Adrian sums up the projects that are reshaping the neighborhood where our office happens to be, just southwest of the Civic Center complex. (Denverite)

Winter Park, CU Boulder don’t advertise on Breitbart:

They’re listed as successes for an anti-Breitbart campaign, but both say that their absence is a result of their marketing companies’ policies, not any particular decision on their parts, as Michael Roberts reports. (Westword)

The Speer Boulevard Lofts planned for Speer Boulevard and Bannock Street. (Courtesy of Greystar Development Group)
The Speer Boulevard Lofts planned for Speer Boulevard and Bannock Street. (Courtesy of Greystar Development Group)
An update on the “Raise the Roof” lawsuit:

If you like reality TV shows about housing… it’s popcorn time, with your host Amy DiPierro. (BusinessDen)

So long, Eat+Drink:

This is the last weekend to try this place on Platte Street that I’ve been forever meaning to try. Let’s see if I try it. Kate Tracy reports. (BusinessDen)

Google gigabit:

Google recently bought a gigabit (read: real fast) internet service provider. First expansion target: a single apartment building in Denver. It’s $60 per month, which is way cheaper than wired gigabit services in the area. Of course, you’ll also need devices that can handle those kinds of extreme speeds, presumably something on the 802.11-ac protocol. Service starts in Denver within three months, as Tamara Chuang reports. (DP)

Sheriff’s deputies want more jail space:

A veteran Denver deputy said that the downtown jail is a “dangerous powder keg that is ripe for another tragedy,” as Noelle Phillips reports. (DP)

Earlier, Susan Greene reported on an eye-popping increase in reports of violent incidents in Denver jails. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.