Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, July 11

Four men walk near the Colfax bridge over Cherry Creek between 1905 and 1915. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Look at these guys. They’re off to do something. One of them has a scroll. Pretend that scroll is the news, freshly rolled for you. Big topics on today’s scroll: two-way streets, Grand Canyon running, politics, development and more.

Four men walk near the Colfax bridge over Cherry Creek between 1905 and 1915. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Four men walk near the Colfax bridge over Cherry Creek between 1905 and 1915. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

It goes both ways:

19th and 20th avenues are the next to be converted from one-way to two-way streets. Stop signs will replace traffic lights. It’s part of an effort to create a more neighborhood-y feel, as Libby Rainey reports. (DP)

Elections & politics:

Democratic Rep. Ed Perlmutter has very surprisingly dropped out of the race for governor. (AP via Denverite)

Carrie Ann Lucas, whom we saw a lot of in the Gardner protests, will run for town board in Windsor. (Independent)

Trump’s voter commission actually doesn’t want your voter information just yet. More than 400 people have unregistered in Denver, many in an attempt to keep their information from the feds.

Betsy DeVos, Newt Gingrich and a bunch of other people will be in town this month with ALEC. (Denverite)

Culture:

Erica reports on Denver artists’ suspicions about the city effort to get DIY spaces fixed up.

Kendrick Lamar’s tour will also bring a pop-up merch shop to Broadway this month. (Denverite)

Development:

Mayor Michael Hancock just gave his big annual speech. This year, rather than basking in the potential of shiny New Denver, Hancock highlighted his roots and the city’s unmet obligations to the Denver that has always been here. Erica reports. Lots of interesting little details. (Denverite)

There’s another last ditch challenge to the I-70 expansion project. See what we did there? (Denverite)

Bus idea:

The city will give 1,500 transit cards to teenagers and study whether it improves their access to summer jobs and whatnot. Could it open the door for more student RTD passes? Eric Gorski reports. (Chalkbeat)

History party:

The Molly Brown House Museum and Molly Brown’s great-granddaughter team up to host a block party in honor of the late Brown’s 150th birthday. It happens July 16, as Ali Longwell reports. (5280)

 

So weird:

Here’s a beautiful photo gallery of all the weird stuff in the warehouse outside Denver where they keep confiscated wildlife goods. (NYT)

Siri, give me some money:

Josh.ai, a “high-end home automation system that listens for voice commands,” just picked up another $8 million. They’re going to triple their office space and move to Cherry Creek, as Tamara Chuang reports. (DP)

For fun?

James Hamblin on running across the Grand Canyon. (Atlantic)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.