Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, July 5

The Cooper Building at 17th and Curtis streets is demolished in 1970. (Robert W. Schott/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

News digest time, friends. We’ve got everything from the newest transit option on South Broadway to the future of East Colfax and more.

The Cooper Building at 17th and Curtis streets is demolished in 1970. (Robert W. Schott/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
The Cooper Building at 17th and Curtis streets is demolished in 1970. (Robert W. Schott/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Free shuttle for South Broadway:

The three-wheeled electric vehicles that currently circulate people around RiNo and LoDo next will expand to South Broadway. The free shuttle route, funded by local businesses, will launch on July 13. Lynn Yen has the details. (BusinessDen)

Is it too late for East Colfax?

Bus rapid transit could spur a development rush along East Colfax, creating a race against time (and developer money) to secure space for affordable housing, as Allison Sherry reports. (CPR)

Garden of No Cars?

The Garden of the Gods Foundation is studying what it would mean to ban automobiles from Garden of the Gods, which currently sees a lot of congestion on its loop road. They’ll make recommendations to the city of Colorado Springs. (Gazette)

Stop it with the drones:

Firefighters at Lightner Creek Fire were “disrupted at least four times in four days by drones.” The aerial machiens get in the way of planes that are supposed to be dropping fire retardant and water. (Durango Herald)

Topgolf stopped:

A judge has declared that a planned Topgolf driving range doesn’t meet zoning requirements to proceed with construction this summer in Thornton, despite the city’s approval. No word on next steps, as Monica Mendoza reports. (DBJ)

Longform:

It’s not Colorado, but this is in my to-read file: On California’s southern border, Pacific Crest Trail through-hikers walk side by side with undocumented immigrants. I wonder if something similar happens on the Continental Divide Trail near the New Mexico border. (High Country)

There’s also this Robert Sanchez piece on the transformation of Leadville, where downtown is booming but undocumented immigrants live in “wilting mobile home parks.” (5280)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.