Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, June 28

An anti-war protest outside the Colorado State Capitol. Corky Gonzales is at far left, under the banner. (Unknown photographer/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. Today’s news roundup includes biking to work, walking Federal, Colorado’s big role in the health care debate and more. Oh — by the way — I just started using the Pocket app. It lets you quickly save articles like this to read later on your phone. I also deleted Twitter off my phone. In combination, it has me reading a lot more in-depth stuff on mobile. Try it!

An anti-war protest outside the Colorado State Capitol. Corky Gonzales is at far left, under the banner. (Unknown photographer/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
An anti-war protest outside the Colorado State Capitol. Corky Gonzales is at far left, under the banner. (Unknown photographer/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Bike to Work Day:

Denver has one of the largest Bike to Work Days in terms of participation in the country. Megan reports. (Denverite)

You can check out all the stations and stuff to do today. (Bike to Work)

Pedestrian hell:

David Sachs takes us on a walking tour of Federal Boulevard. Even the most pedestrian-friendly intersection gave just 15 seconds to cross the busy road. Sachs also dives into the CDOT plans for the area. Love this approach. (Streetsblog)

Hick’s big day:

Gov. John Hickenlooper joined Gov. John Kasich of Ohio to lead a bipartisan uprising of governors against the health care bill. They were working on this plan since February, Hickenlooper said. It may have played a role in derailing the Republican plan. (NYT)

Meanwhile, Kalyn Heffernan of Wheelchair Sports Camp has joined a disability rights group in a sit-in at Sen. Cory Gardner’s office. It was running on 24 hours last I checked. (Westword)

Unhappy airlines:

The major airlines have banded together to critique Denver International Airport’s $1.3 billion public-private plan to renovate the main terminal. “Simply put, this is not a sound investment,” a letter from the airline states. Councilman Wayne New also says he feels rushed. Jon Murray reports. (DP)

Crazy art:

Twenty people will be able to create simultaneous music outside Denver Art Museum by… sitting on chairs? It’s free and starts Friday. (Denverite)

Emily Griffith:

The group that’s agreed to redevelop the historic Emily Griffith campus hasn’t decided yet what will go on the downtown Denver site. But the Denver Urban Renewal Authority is already planning to create an urban renewal area for the campus so it can collect tax dollars for a yet-to-be determined project there. Adrian reports. (Denverite)

Jeffco will take money:

Jefferson County’s elected officials talked and listened for roughly six hours on Tuesday before deciding to accept a $1.7 million grant for affordable housing and other programs. The unexpected controversy shows growing suburban tension from the housing crisis. (Denverite)

Snooze news:

Snooze opened its first Westminster location today at 6315 W. 104th Ave. Here’s what else is new. (The Know)

State and church:

Two years ago, the Colorado Supreme Court struck down a program that allowed public money to indirectly fund religious schools in Douglas County, the suburban area that includes Lone Tree and Castle Rock.

Now the U.S. Supreme Court has ordered that the highest Colorado court take up the case again. This is another sign that the Supreme Court may expand religious rights. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.