Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, June 29

Flood waters near the 23rd Street viaduct in Lower Downtown, Denver, in 1933. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library

Hi. Today’s roundup includes the latest on a police leadership controversy; the 16th Street Mall; a new thing for Stapleton; the protest in Cory Gardner’s office; and everything else that caught my little eye. #love2readthelocalnews

Flood waters near the 23rd Street viaduct in Lower Downtown, Denver, in 1933. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library
Flood waters near the 23rd Street viaduct in Lower Downtown, Denver, in 1933. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)

The weather:

It’s a high of 86 today with a chance of storms and showers this afternoon and evening.

Police controversy:

Denver’s police union is trying to force the prosecution of Chief Robert White and Deputy Chief Matt Murray. The DA previously announced she would not seek misdemeanor charges over their alleged mishandling of an open records request. The police union alleges the leaders got special treatment. Noelle Phillips reports. (DP)

Stapleton:

A Sprouts grocery store will anchor a really rather large new development at Central Park Station. It’s set to open next fall. (Denverite)

Gardner campout:

As of last night, disability rights activists had been in Sen. Cory Gardner’s office for 39 hours demanding answers on potential cuts to Medicaid. They got attention from some really big names. We’ll update once we get a hold of them this morning. (Denverite)

Broncos and weed:

Two former Broncos are among the people allegedly tricked into giving money to an illegal weed operation. They apparently thought it was a legal weed operation. Big difference. No charges for the former Broncos, though. (Denverite)

16th Street Mall:

The shuttle buses are going to stay on the Mall, but other changes may be coming. Megan reports. (Denverite)

More art:

This Friday, you can check out Golden Triangle’s new Final Friday art walks. It’s free to attend, 5 to 9 p.m. (5280)

Biking Denver:

About 7 percent of people who work downtown commute on a bike, while the citywide percentage is 3 percent. In Portland, Oregon, that citywide figure is 6 to 10 percent. Danika Worthington and Erin Douglas have a good feature on our city’s bike culture. (DP)

Tick bite:

A pair of tick bites that happened near Nederland left a dog paralyzed. An emergency vet initially misdiagnosed the problem, but the dog returned to normal once the owners removed the ticks. This is apparently a very rare thing. (9, with autoplay video)

Squeaky Bean, nooooo:

The Squeaky Bean just closed. I liked their burger. Bye, Bean. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.