Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, June 30

Color photograph of Miss Juneteenth with two young girl attendants, Five Points, 1989. (Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/ARL47)

juneteenth; five points; archive; denver public library; denver; colorado; history;

Hey there. Read this if you want to know what the biggest stories in Denver are today and what to do this weekend. Big topics include the arrests at Sen. Gardner’s office, changes near the University of Denver and more.

Color photograph of Miss Juneteenth with two young girl attendants, Five Points, 1989. (Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/ARL47) juneteenth; five points; archive; denver public library; denver; colorado; history;
Color photograph of Miss Juneteenth with two young girl attendants, Five Points, 1989. (Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/ARL47)

Pressure on Gardner:

A sit-in at Sen. Cory Gardner’s office ended with the arrest of ten people, most of them with disabilities. They were protesting because proposed changes to Medicaid could result in reduced funding and cuts to services. Gardner’s staff says that the landlord demanded the overnight protest end. (Denverite)

Podcast time:

Reading is so last year. Listen to a lovely discussion of the local news instead. (Denverite)

Comic Con time:

Here’s what to do this pre-holiday weekend, from outdoor movies to Comic Con. (Denverite)

Also, here’s where all the fireworks will be, starting tomorrow. (Denverite)

University:

The University of Denver wants to improve how it’s connected to nearby neighborhoods. It already is working with the city on a one-way York Street and more is in store, as Adrian reports. (Denverite)

History I didn’t know:

After World War II, a federal program encouraged Native Americans to move from reservations to nine American cities. Denver was one of those cities, and native communities here are still dealing with the consequences, as our intern Joseph Rios reports. (Denverite)

Please be careful:

A New York man became lost in Great Sand Dunes for five days in deep snow in February. He survived, but he returned to the park last month. His body was found this week. He had not gotten a permit or left an itinerary with anyone, as Tom McGhee reports. (DP)

In other parks news, a new mandatory reservation system will likely go into effect for Conundrum Hot Springs and eventually Four Pass Loop, starting next summer. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.