Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Mar. 1

Route to the Colorado gold regions, 1864. (Rocky Mountain Gold Mining Co./Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/CG4312.P25 1854 .R6)

Hi. Today’s news roundup will explain how Denver disciplines its mayor (it doesn’t), the latest on the housing market and, also, weird traffic signals.

Route to the Colorado gold regions, 1864. (Rocky Mountain Gold Mining Co./Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/CG4312.P25 1854 .R6)
Route to the Colorado gold regions, 1864. (Rocky Mountain Gold Mining Co./Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/CG4312.P25 1854 .R6)

Weather:

A high of 52 today and mostly sunny. It’ll be warmer this weekend, but there should be some mountain snow on Sunday. (Denverite)

Harassment allegations:

A city employee could be disciplined or fired if they sent the kind of text messages that Mayor Michael Hancock sent to a police officer in 2012. Those rules don’t apply to the mayor, though. (Denverite)

Rep. Steve Lebsock could become the second state lawmaker in the U.S. to be expelled for harassment allegations since the #MeToo movement gained momentum. The debate starts today. (CPR)

Development:

Denver home prices are still rising, but the rate of growth is slowing. (CPR)

Three-hundred more apartments are proposed for Denargo Market at the edge of the River North district. (BusinessDen)

Denver is the No. 4 bet for Amazon HQ2, according to a Zillow survey of economists. Atlanta, Northern Virginia and Austin rank higher. (Denver Business Journal)

Beer & weed:

The traditional way of measuring bitterness is not relevant, or accurate, or even useful,” said Neil Fisher, the head brewer and owner at WeldWerks Brewing. (The Know)

Apparently, this Texas college baseball coach won’t consider any Colorado recruits because of legal weed. (ABC)

The leaders of the Denver cannabis church were charged with open consumption misdemeanors after a police sting of their 4/20 celebration. Their day in court ended in a mistrial in part because two jurors liked legal weed too much. It doesn’t help that “open and public consumption” still hasn’t been defined. (What a time to be alive.) The case could return in July. Alex Pasquariello reports. (The Cannabist)

Politics:

Seven candidates for governor will answer questions from Colorado students at a forum on mental health next month. (Chalkbeat)

Trivia:

Why does Denver have traffic lights in spots where there’s no intersection? You asked, so Allan got answers for you. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.