Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, March 13

An aerial view of the June 17, 1965 flood that ravaged Denver. The view includes the railyards south of 14th Street. (George Meister/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/X-11000168O)

Hi. Today’s news roundup includes the future of Elitch Gardens, slot homes and more. Let’s go.

An aerial view of the June 17, 1965 flood that ravaged Denver. The view includes the railyards south of 14th Street. (George Meister/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/X-11000168O)
An aerial view of the June 17, 1965 flood that ravaged Denver. The view includes the railyards south of 14th Street. (George Meister/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/X-11000168O)

Development:

“River Mile” plans would replace Elitch Gardens with glassy high-rise buildings alongside plazas and parks on the bank of the South Platte River — but that won’t happen for decades. First, they’ll redevelop the parking lots. (Denverite)

Denver will no longer accept applications to build the much-criticized residential structures known as “slot homes,” which have spread for years. (Denverite)

The Front Range Airport near DIA wants to become a spaceport for suborbital flights and commercial space transportation, John Aguilar reports. They’ve applied for a license, which could be decided by Aug. 19. John Aguilar reports. (DP)

Harassment:

Councilman Rafael Espinoza wants an investigation into Mayor Michael Hancock’s text messages with a subordinate. (DP)

Schools:

A little over a month after a “Race and Faith” chapel event that ruffled the feathers of some students and parents — and a heated follow-up forum with administrators —  an Arvada private school fired the faculty member responsible for it. Allan reports.(Denverite)

Blocks of Hope, a project meant to provide educational and social services within the boundaries of a high-poverty Adams County school, is scaling back. (Chalkbeat)

Students at dozens of schools are planning a walkout at 10 a.m. Wednesday in the wake of the Parkland shooting. (Chalkbeat)

The Colorado State Supreme Court ruled that schools can suspend teachers without pay before they even have a disciplinary hearing. (Courthouse)

The law:

Here’s where Colorado gubernatorial candidates stand on sanctuary cities. Esteban reports. (Denverite)

Greta Lindecrantz, the Mennonite investigator who refused to testify in a death-penalty case, has changed her mind. Susan Greene tells us what it means. (Independent)

An operator of rehab facilities in Colorado faces up to 65 years in prison after he was convicted for sexually assaulting or exploiting seven patients. Christopher Osher reports. (DP)

Colorado prosecutors filed more than 15,200 felony drug cases last year — double the number filed six years earlier. Of those sentenced to prison, 84 percent were originally charged with possession. Osher again. (DP)

That stolen snow cat — The General Lee — was found at the home of 27-year-old Jason Cuervo along with weapons, ammunition, drugs and drug paraphernalia. After barricading himself in his home, Cuervo escaped the police. (Vail Daily)

Food:

Denver’s Shake Shack will open March 21. (Denverite)

Here comes another food hall — this one inside the old Tony’s Market. (BusinessDen)

Science:

Birds near oil fields change their songs to adapt to the noise of heavy machinery. (NYT)

Archaeologists found a 500-year-old part of a Spanish pistol in Mesa County, Joe Vaccarelli reports. It predates historical records of a Spanish presence in the area. (Sentinel)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.