Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, March 17

The Astrauvar Bet Yakov Congregation had a building beneath the 16th Street Viaduct sometime in the 1920s or '30s. (L.D. Regnier/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)

I would very much like to ride my bike today, and it’d be cool if it was the ’80s too. (See below for inspiration.) First, though, the news – from a Chipotle shakeup to federal budget cuts, internment camps, your weekend planner and more.

Four young men beneath the 14th Street viaduct in Denver. (Courtesy Mark Kiryluk)
Four young men beneath the 14th Street viaduct in Denver. (Courtesy Mark Kiryluk)

What Trump would cut in Colorado:

The Denver Post has an astute breakdown of organizations and agencies in Colorado that are on the president’s chopping block. We’re looking at losing $34 million of community development grants, including $13.2 million for housing aid. CU Boulder could lose significant research funding. CPR would lose 5 percent of its funding. Airlines would lose subsidies for routes from DIA to small airports. Amtrak’s long-distance routes through the state are at risk. Denver Public Schools could lose $10 million per year. The list goes on – but, remember, this is far from a done deal. (DP)

What to do this weekend:

Karaoke hip-hop tonight at the Museum of Contemporary Art, a photography lecture at Denver Art Museum, pickles cheese and beer at Diebolt…  Ashley’s got your planner. (Denverite)

Colorado will be debating internment camps:

The state legislature’s on track for a larger debate about a bill that by some interpretations would make Colorado a “sanctuary state,” although its sponsors haven’t used that language. It would forbid certain cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement and the future creation of any registries or internment camps on religious or national bases. (Denverite)

Affordable housing in Boulder?

Nope. A new study finds that there are essentially no affordable homes available in Boulder County. Exactly 99 single-family homes sold for less than $250,000 in the county last year, as Shay Castle reports. (Boulder Daily Camera)

Don’t eat Walmart pizza:

No, seriously – they’re recalling “about 21,220 pounds” of Marketside Extra Large Supreme Pizza units that were sold in Colorado and other states for possible listeria contamination. I do like this idea of ordering pizza by the pound. Product code is 20547. DO NOT EAT THE PIZZA. (Reuters)

Colorado Medicaid cuts:

You know by now that Obamacare expanded Medicaid, which provides health care for poor people. Various changes under the Republican replacement plan could cut billions in the money Colorado gets for that program, potentially reducing the number of Medicaid members in Colorado by 600,000 as of 2030, unless the state can come up with a lot of money to fund the program itself. (CPR

Heroin at the library:

Denver Public Library is where hundreds of homeless people stop for shelter among the stacks. With that, and with the library’s general popularity, comes drug use. Six people have overdosed in 2017 at the central branch, and the library in turn has started stocking overdose medication, as Ana Campbell reports. (Westword)

Taser death:

A man shocked with a Taser during a fight with Thornton police officers suffered an immediate “medical episode” and died on Thursday night, as Tom McGhee reports. (DP)

Wood chips to fuel:

Cool Planet (great name) has raised $19 million for its wood-to-fuel processing business, as Kate Tracy reports. (BusinessDen)

 

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.