Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, March 22

Boys and a teacher from Clayton College look on as a man operates a printing press at the Denver Post printing plant in Denver, Colorado on Jan. 8, 1913. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. Sometimes, I delay working on my best ideas because I’m afraid they won’t turn out to be that great — and, also, because they’re harder than my crappy ideas. Am I the only one? Let me know. Meanwhile, some news.

Boys and a teacher from Clayton College look on as a man operates a printing press at the Denver Post printing plant in Denver, Colorado on Jan. 8, 1913. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Boys and a teacher from Clayton College look on as a man operates a printing press at the Denver Post printing plant in Denver, Colorado on Jan. 8, 1913. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Development:

The Broncos are working with the city of Denver to develop a plan to transform half of the surface parking lots around Sports Authority Field at Mile High into a neighborhood. (Denverite)

The “River Mile” project, which eventually would replace Elitch Gardens, could one day be home to 15,000 people, its developer said. Allan reports. (Denverite)

Low-income tax credits are one of the main ways of funding affordable housing. Their value is likely dropping due to the new tax law. (Affordable Housing Finance)

Another homeowner says they could be forced to sell because they didn’t realize they bought an income-restricted house. Brandon Rittiman and Anna Staver report. (9News)

Learning:

Denver parents of students with disabilities are concerned about a planned reorganization of the school district’s special education department. Melanie Asmar reports. (Chalkbeat)

The Center for Colorado Women’s History opened inside the Byers-Evans House, where it’s surrounded by institutions Anne Evans helped build. Ashley reports. (Denverite)

Beasts of the west:

Exciting moose news: there are more and more of them in Rocky Mountain National Park. Probably someone’s been giving them muffins. (AP)

Bison are roaming the Soapstone Prairie Natural Area near Fort Collins, and scientists are cleaning disease from their sperm. Stephanie Daniel reports. (KUNC)

Transportation:

The Colorado Senate may have a compromise on a plan to raise debt for road fixes. Sam Brasch on the ones and twos. (CPR)

Regulators should vote next week on whether to allow the G Line to open. A John Aguilar joint. (DP)

The zoo:

The Denver Zoo is looking at its first admission fee increase since 2014. Adult tickets would rise from $17 to $20, while children’s tickets would go from $12 to $14 and seniors from $14 to $17. The Denver City Council would have to approve. Vicente Arenas reports. (KDVR)

Media:

Sadly, we’re learning of the first people to leave or be laid off from The Denver Post in this latest round of cuts. So far, it’s Kourtney Geers, the director of digital news production, and Jason Blevins, a staff writer who has covered adventure sports and other outdoors issues.

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.