Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, March 3

United Farm Workers of America (UFW) supporters picket the Denver City and County building in 1975. The picketers protest Judge Robert Cummins' decision to jail UFW coordinator Jerry Ryan for refusing to remove his "Boycott Gallo" button at the beginning of his trial for a prior arrest for picketing. Denver Boycott supporters were cited and/or arrested 102 times during the Gallo boycott between 1974-1976. Defended pro-bono by National Lawyers Guild, supporters were never convicted of a single charge brought by police when arrests were made in attempts to break the boycott. (Denver Public Library/Mike Wilzoch/Western History Department/AUR-2469)

It’s Friday. Buckle down and finish your work so you’ll feel better this weekend. First, though, make yourself more aware of this world. Today’s roundup: 16th Street Mall, an internal police investigation, a private immigration jail’s alleged wrongdoing and my adventure with a disembodied foot.

United Farm Workers of America (UFW) supporters picket the Denver City and County building in 1975. The picketers protest Judge Robert Cummins' decision to jail UFW coordinator Jerry Ryan for refusing to remove his "Boycott Gallo" button at the beginning of his trial for a prior arrest for picketing. Denver Boycott supporters were cited and/or arrested 102 times during the Gallo boycott between 1974-1976. Defended pro-bono by National Lawyers Guild, supporters were never convicted of a single charge brought by police when arrests were made in attempts to break the boycott. (Denver Public Library/Mike Wilzoch/Western History Department/AUR-2469)
United Farm Workers of America (UFW) supporters picket the Denver City and County building in 1975, protesting Judge Robert Cummins’ decision to jail UFW coordinator Jerry Ryan for refusing to remove his “Boycott Gallo” button at the beginning of his trial for a prior arrest for picketing.  (Denver Public Library/Mike Wilzoch/Western History Department/AUR-2469)
Ballot selfies:

The least meaningful controversy of the election was the ballot selfie. Now Colorado lawmakers have passed a bill that, if signed by Gov. John Hickenlooper, would make it legal to take a photo with your ballot, as Peter Marcus reports. (Colorado Politics)

Where are the new 16th Street shuttles?

Only a few of the new electric Mall shuttles have been deployed, despite the fact that they were supposed to hit the road months ago. The city blames manufacturer BYD Motors, as Michael Roberts reports. (Westword)

Speer’s house sold:

A home that once belonged to Mayor Robert Speer just sold for $3.6 million, and Amy DiPierro’s got a history lesson to boot. The home is on Humboldt Street. (BusinessDen)

Deputy chief investigation:

Deputy Police Chief Matt Murray says he welcomes an independent investigation of how he handled an investigation of a sexual-assault case and the subsequent arrests of an officer and a woman, Noelle Phillips reports. (DP)

Immigration jail lawsuit:

A federal judge allowed the creation of a class of potentially 60,000 plaintiffs in a lawsuit against GEO, the for-profit operator of an immigration detention facility in Aurora. This allows the original plaintiffs to fight for monetary damages for everyone who passed through the prison since 2004. The claims are that GEO forced them to clean toilets by threatening solitary confinement and that it paid them just $1 a day for other janitorial and clerical work. (Denverite)

Me and the foot:

The Rock Rest Lodge is probably the weirdest bar in the metro, but it may be a little less weird after I asked questions about a disembodied and very real-looking foot. (Denverite)

 

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.