Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, March 9

People gather at the Denver Municipal Airport (Stapleton Airport) to view fighters and transport planes of the 95th Pursuit Squadron of the U.S. Army in March 1931. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/Engle #40484 DPLW)

Hi. Sometimes I have to travel to the far ends of the internet to find good stuff to put in here. Sometimes, it just springs out of my computer – like it did today. We’ve got everything from coal rolling to Whole Foods news to a massive transportation spending plan, a ton of restaurant news and more.

People gather at the Denver Municipal Airport (Stapleton Airport) to view fighters and transport planes of the 95th Pursuit Squadron of the U.S. Army in March 1931. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/Engle #40484 DPLW)
People gather at the Denver Municipal Airport (Stapleton Airport) to view fighters and transport planes of the 95th Pursuit Squadron of the U.S. Army in March 1931. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History and Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/Engle #40484 DPLW)

Obnoxiousness still legal:

A proposal that would have made it illegal to “roll coal” died in committee yesterday, John Tomasic reported. Rolling coal is the practice of intentionally blowing clouds of black soot from modified diesel engines. Opponents said restrictions could have been used to target harmless diesel vehicles and could be “the tip of the spear” for tighter vehicle regulations. Nobody there actually supported the practice of recreational coal rolling. (Colorado Statesman)

Whole Foods news:

The grocer is strongly considering keeping some kind of presence in Cap Hill even as it closes its store there. Meanwhile, Adrian got more details on the new store opening in a Union Station apartment building. (Denverite)

Billions for transportation:

The state’s political parties have settled on a plan to increase sales taxes and borrow up to $3.5 billion to spend on transportation. The plan would put $300 million a year toward the state highway fund, dividing the remainder between the municipalities and a new “multimodal transportation options” fund, as Erica reports. (Denverite)

The sun – so hot right now:

Colorado’s solar power capacity increased by 70 percent in 2016, but that wasn’t enough to keep us in the top ten states for solar production, Aldo Svaldi reports. (DP)

Snooze sequel:

A former executive chef at the bonkers-popular breakfastery Snooze is soon to open Morning Collective at 2160 South Broadway. The specialty is stuffed French toast, Mark Antonation reports. (Westword)

In other restaurant news, Kimbal Musk’s The Kitchen is trying out a new concept called Hedge Row. Not much detail yet, except that the menu will include short ribs and trout, according to Allyson Reedy. (The Know)

Also, Zuni Street Brewing Company opened in Lower Highland yesterday, Samantha Harris reports. (5280)

Finally, you should really let Ashley take you to Adrift, where there’s a whole new happy hour. I love happy hour. (Denverite)

Help farmers:

The Colorado Farm Bureau is collecting money for agricultural communities impacted by the large fire in northeastern Colorado this week. (Colorado Farm Bureau)

Hickenlooper dubious of marijuana clubs:

The governor said he would veto a measure that would allow cannabis use at businesses around the state, as John Frank and Alicia Wallace report. He might support it if smoking indoors was expressly banned. Even if it passes, cities would retain control over the practice. (DP)

Meanwhile, the state could owe $53 million to the feds because a computer miscalculated some stuff about Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act, as Brian Eason and Jennifer Brown report. (DP)

Oh, yeah:

We’re merging with Spirited Media, which operates Billy Penn and The Incline in Pennsylvania. In short, this means Denverite will be staying right here. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.