Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, May 1

The 20th Street viaduct. (Robert Louis McClure/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/MCC-4169)denver public library; lodo; downtown; archival; history; viaduct; transportation; denver; colorado;

Hey. Today’s news roundup is much beefier than we usually get on a Monday – must be spring in the air. We’ve got good advice on real estate, good eating at Civic Center, a decision on Karen Oliveto’s church role, Star Wars stuff and more.

The 20th Street viaduct. (Robert Louis McClure/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/MCC-4169) denver public library; lodo; downtown; archival; history; viaduct; transportation; denver; colorado;
The old 20th Street viaduct. (Robert Louis McClure/Denver Public Library/Western History Collection/MCC-4169)

Good advice:

Natasha Gardner has compiled a buying guide based on advice from a range of real-estate experts. She advises buying off-season, thinking about trade-offs and sticking around as a back-up buyer. Check it out. (5280)

Lunchtime:

Civic Center Eats starts its season this Tuesday, as Andra Zeppelin reports. The food-truck rodeo runs three times a week from now through October. They’ll be drawing from a pool of 69 vendors this year, with 20 present at each event. It runs 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays at Civic Center. (Eater)

Karen Oliveto:

The court of the United Methodist Church found that Bishop Karen Oliveto violates the church ban on clergy who are “self-avowed practicing homosexuals.” The decision puts her on track for a disciplinary hearing that could remove her from her position leading the church’s congregations in Colorado and neighboring states. (AP/Denverite)

Monumental update:

President Donald Trump has ordered a review of national monuments (protected natural areas, mostly) around the country. Governor John Hickenlooper has said that he’s been assured by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke that this doesn’t apply to Canyons of the Ancients in Colorado, but the federal agency says no decision has been made, as Joey Bunch reports. The review will take several months. (Colorado Politics)

Riding the rails:

RTD got another waiver from the feds. They now can keep the A and B lines running until July 30, as Cathy Proctor reports. (DBJ)

The transit agency actually had told the feds they’re right on the verge of fixing the crossing-gate problems that plague the new lines, and they asked that the waiver be extended until the fix was certified, but I guess the feds didn’t bite. RTD also has asked to start testing the G Line to Arvada and Wheat Ridge, but no word on that yet.

Star Wars parties:

Apparently May the Fourth (as in, may the force be with you) is more of a thing than I thought. Lots of fun events in this roundup by John Wenzel, including an art party, trivia, a sexy party and music. (The Know)

Aurora and Trump:

Rachel Cernansky has a feature, which is well worth your time, about the Trump presidency and the lives of refugees in diverse Aurora. (5280)

Cuddler shift:

Babies born with opioids in their system require lots of extra care and comfort. In Pueblo, a hospital is dealing with so many of these cases that they’re bringing in volunteers to cuddle the infants, as Andrea Dukakis reports. (CPR)

Giant climbing gym:

Earth Treks plans to open the country’s largest indoor climbing facility in the carcass of a Sports Authority in Englewood at Hampden Avenue and South Santa Fe Drive this year, as Jason Blevins reports. (DP)

What does the weed church mean for pot clubs?

Elevation Ministries had weed consumption at its private launch party. One lawyer sees this as an opening for pot clubs, but the city insists that strictly private events have always been able to do that, as Megan reports. (Denverite)

Cole sale:

Looks like the hot market continues to spread northeast from RiNo. Several acres at York Street and 40th Avenue just sold for $5 million. (CREJ)

Climate change and equity:

The city of Denver has mapped out the potential impacts of rising temperatures on people’s lives in Denver. The results show that heatwaves may have the heaviest human impacts in western and northern neighborhoods, splitting along the same lines as many other inequities in health and life outcomes. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.