Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, May 12

An aerial view of Denver circa 1945 shows the Colorado State Capitol at bottom. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. I’ve never tried to nail down the formula for what goes in this morning news round-up, but it goes something like this: Most of it should directly involve Denver, or at least Colorado. Topics that appear often include the future, the past, immigration, environment, marijuana, inequity, the science of the West and neighborhood news tend to show up – just like they did today. Hope you find it useful.

An aerial view of Denver circa 1945 shows the Colorado State Capitol at bottom. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
An aerial view of Denver circa 1945 shows the Colorado State Capitol at bottom. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Jeanette:

This was quite surprising: Jeanette Vizguerra is leaving sanctuary this morning. She was granted a stay of deportation that will allow her to resume normal life for at least another two years. Arturo Garcia, who also previously took sanctuary, has been granted a stay too. We’ll be watching to see what, if anything, this says about the national immigration debate. Erica reports the heck out of it. (Denverite)

Micro-hydro:

This fascinates me: Denver Water is testing an advanced new type of electric generator that should allow it to harvest electricity from small, slow-moving flows of water. This could be part of a major change in where and how we can do hydro power. (Denverite)

Speaking of water:

We still don’t know when Colorado Mills will reopen after the hail storm. Adrian reports. (Denverite)

GO HIKING:

This weekend will be beautiful. Here are some suggestions for warmup trails that are great for springtime. (Denverite)

Podcast time:

Maybe it’s just because I’m on it sometimes, but I find Paul Karolyi’s Denverite Now podcast to be refreshing and informative. (Denverite)

4/20 trouble continues?

A local insurance company says they’re still owed more than $10,000 for coverage of the Civic Center 4/20 rally, according to Shaul Turner. (KDVR)

Craftsy got boughtsy:

The startup makes videos about… crafts? NBCUniversal bought a majority stake and will keep it in Denver. Here’s the rest of April Bohnert’s tech roundup. (Built In)

RiNo doing RiNo things:

An upcoming office development will actually be a bunch of trailers, shipping containers and a warehouse. Amy DiPierro got the scoop. (BusinessDen)

Meanwhile, Denver’s looking at ways to open up another mile of the South Platte River near National Western. (Denverite)

No porch pot:

A very strange legislative debate ended with no result. You will still not be formally allowed to smoke weed on your front porch. However, one lawmaker did say, rhetorically, “I like to put trays and buffets of edibles all around my front porch and consume to my heart’s content.” Go read the rest from Peter Marcus. (Colorado Politics)

Youth detention:

The Colorado Division of Youth Corrections will be renamed to “youth services” following “intense scrutiny” on reports of “violence, pain-compliance techniques and a body restraint called the ‘wrap.'” As Jennifer Brown reports, a reform law also creates a pilot program for rehabilitative care, and it institutes new independent review. Read, please. (DP)

Roads and transit:

State lawmakers used a funding mechanism that I frankly don’t get in order to secure $1.8 billion for transportation. About 10 percent goes to transit and 25 percent to rural roads, but a lot of people want more — and it may mean the legislature ain’t done yet. Erica, hit it! (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.