Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, May 2

Winchell's Donut House in 1981 at 4301 West 38th Avenue. (Roger Whitacre/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)

Hello. Minutes make hours make days. Our lives are passing very quickly, so let’s all find something to care about. Today, we’ve got a table tennis story that says more about the world than I would ever imagine, a meditation on South Platte development, an update on the Catholic Church and LGBT rights in Denver, the meaning of an epic parking fight and more.

Winchell's Donut House in 1981 at 4301 West 38th Avenue. (Roger Whitacre/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)
Winchell’s Donut House in 1981 at 4301 West 38th Avenue. (Roger Whitacre/Western History and Genealogy Department/Denver Public Library)

The man who owns Denver’s table tennis scene for a darn good reason:

O.B. Fon is the king of the tables at Ace. For a long time, his victories were a lifeline to his home in Cameroon. Read this surprising and sweeping story by Kevin, please. (Denverite)

Why hasn’t Water Street redeveloped?

The area around the Downtown Denver Aquarium fascinates me with its mix of parking lots and century-old buildings along the South Platte River. I was glad to see this post by Steve Ferris about why it hasn’t developed and what might ultimately happen there. (Colorado Real Estate Journal)

Catholicism:

The Archdiocese of Denver will not cut ties with Boy Scouts of America over BSA’s recent acceptance of transgender children and gay adults. However, Catholic Church-sponsored units in Denver will be required to exempt themselves from that new Scouts policy of acceptance. In short, transgender kids still won’t be allowed in Church-affiliated units. (Denverite)

Meanwhile, hundreds of people, including former mayor Federico Peña, are protesting the Archdiocese’s decision to close Our Lady of Visitation at Federal and 64th. (CBS4)

Parking saga:

Denver’s leaders have finally decided how much parking to require when small lots develop in neighborhoods. Any small-lot project near transit will have to have parking if it reaches three floors in height; farther away from transit, the requirement kicks in at two floors. Erica lays out quite clearly why this matters and what this whole discussion has missed. (Denverite)

I-25 fast, I-25 furious:

Street racers take over Interstate 25 at 160 mph on Sunday nights, according to Douglas County law enforcement. Jennifer Kovaleski got a great look inside the dangerous weekly races here, including an explanation of why they haven’t been shut down: “We just simply could not keep up with them if we wanted to,” one lieutenant says. But they’ll still try, as Kovaleski reports. (ABC7)

What’s going to happen?

The preliminary state budget essentially cut $528 million of state and federal money for hospitals. A deal to fix that may be falling apart – and time is running short. Erica’s got you. (Denverite)

Idea:

Maybe you should plan to see an author speak at Tattered Cover? Cory Doctorow on May 9 looks pretty cool. Books are good.

The JeffCo brand:

Jefferson County has a new logo which seems to represent, appropriately, a bunch of development that abruptly ends in front of some hills. #brands (DP)

The new Jefferson County brand. (JeffCo)
The new Jefferson County brand. (JeffCo)
Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.