Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, May 25

Men and women sing, play a portable piano and cello at the Garden of Angels, also known as Red Rocks Amphitheater circa 1908. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. The beauty of Red Rocks is that the acoustics are good enough that you can just kind of stand down there and holler, as shown in the photo below. Honestly, though, I’m more like the piano player than the singers: slightly unsure of all this but still happy to be near the action.

Today, in local action, we’ve got feminism at the museum, the value of public art, preparation for 14er season, a new anti-eviction strategy and more.

Men and women sing, play a portable piano and cello at the Garden of Angels, also known as Red Rocks Amphitheater circa 1908. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Men and women sing and play a portable piano and cello at the Garden of Angels, also known as Red Rocks Amphitheater, circa 1908. (Harry Mellon Rhoads/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Feminism at MCA this weekend:

Did you know the city’s Museum of Contemporary Art has a yearly three-day series of events, lectures, exhibition openings, music and performance? Rupert Jenkins has an interview with co-founder Elissa Auther for the 10th annual Feminism & Co. (One Good Eye)

The happening starts today. Details here. (MCA)

Find your 14er:

Ashley talked to a pro and pulled together a prep guide for 14er season. I’ve got Grays, Torreys and Huron on my list. Bierstadt was fun once, but, no thanks. I saw dudes playing beer pong up there last time. Solitude it ain’t. (Denverite)

What’s a giant bear worth?

This story started out as a giant list of what Denver has paid for every piece of public art in its collection. Then it kind of turned into reporting/thinking about the value of art. I had fun. (Denverite)

Boulder on the hunt for anarchists:

Apparently Boulder’s anarchist vandalists aren’t very good at drawing fire. Also, they recently hit a dozen properties with maybe 50 tags. Elizabeth Hernandez reports. (Daily Camera)

Vermont not sure about weed:

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott vetoed a bill that would have legalized recreational marijuana. Still, he left the door open for another try, specifically saying he wanted more detail on education and impaired driving, among other details, as Omar Sacirbey reports. (Marijuana Business Daily)

Housing assistance:

Denver’s using $1.5 million from its affordable housing fund to help people facing eviction. Erica reports. (Denverite)

Coffman steps in on unsolved murder:

The Republican congressman is putting pressure on the Denver mayor’s administration, saying that family members of 16-year-old Sang-Hyuk Kim feel police have “ignored the case.” (DP)

Matador building sold:

The building at 3496 West 32nd Ave. sold for $5.2 million. It’s a two-story building with Matador on the first floor and apartments on the second. No word on what’s to come. John Winslow reports. (CREJ)

Sovereign:

Chris Walker has a long read on people in San Luis Valley who don’t really believe in the law as we know it. Think bunkers, armed standoffs and generally a miniature version of the Cliven Bundy thing. (Westword)

Cocktail time:

Eater has its latest map of the city’s newest cocktail joints. (Eater)

 

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.