Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Nov. 15

Men pose in November 1930 on a truck near the Mayan Theatre at 110 Broadway in the Speer neighborhood of Denver. (	Rocky Mountain Photo Co./Denver Public Library/X-24681)

Hey there. Today’s news roundup hits everything from mag-lev transit to a big mountain snowstorm. It’s pretty similar to our newsletter today, but I added some interesting bonus stories on “digital sanctuaries” and “green chile sauce.” Read on, readers.

Men pose in November 1930 on a truck near the Mayan Theatre at 110 Broadway in the Speer neighborhood of Denver. (Rocky Mountain Photo Co./Denver Public Library/X-24681)
Men pose in November 1930 on a truck near the Mayan Theatre at 110 Broadway in the Speer neighborhood of Denver. ( Rocky Mountain Photo Co./Denver Public Library/X-24681)

The mountains:

The mountains could get 5 to 15 inches of snow starting Friday, just as more resorts are coming online. (Denverite)

Immigration:

Some “sanctuary” cities are trying to limit federal access to data by eliminating gang databases, purging municipal ID databases and more. No mention of Denver in Tanvi Misra’s report. (CityLab)

Art:

Ashley has a feature story on artists being pushed out of Denver’s housing market. (Denverite)

Mayor Michael Hancock and poet Claudia Rankine will converse tonight at Boettcher Concert Hall, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. (EventBrite)

Reddit started a Photoshop battle with our photo of Councilman Jolon Clark’s cat. It was pretty cool. (Denverite)

The Denver Art Museum has elaborate plans to protect its stuff during the big renovation. Donna Bryson explains. (AP)

Amazon:

Part of Denver’s pitch for Amazon’s second headquarters included two pages on a futuristic, driverless shuttle.

The city highlighted seven incentives programs that could make the move financially easier on Amazon, potentially offering more than $9.8 million in incentives. (Denverite)

Whole Foods, an Amazon subsidiary, opens today near Union Station. Adrian reports. (Denverite)

Food:

“Top Chef” came to Colorado to show the world our cuisine is more than elk meat and trout. I’m not sure people ever really thought that, but outsiders are intrigued by our “green chile sauce,” as Lori Rackl reports. The season debuts Dec. 7. (Chicago Tribune)

Mobility:

If your sidewalk is broken, Denver will eventually make you fix it, and they might help you pay for it. (Denverite)

The mag-lev transit startup Arrivo wants to start building its Denver test track as early as 2018. Their idea is to zip cars and people around urban environments at 300 mph. We’ll see. Michael Roberts reports. (Westword)

Denver made $2.4 million off seized cars in 2016. The city’s nuisance abatement ordinance can be applied to vehicles even if the owner is never convicted of a crime, and new asset forfeiture rules at the state level don’t apply, as Rob Low reports. The city attorney defends the practice. (Fox31)

The I-70 project will cost $2.2 billion over 30 years, Jon Murray reports. (DP)

Harassment:

State Rep. Steve Lebsock denied allegations of sexual harassment and said he’s getting harassing texts and fake job offers. One of his three accusers said Lebsock has revealed his lack of character. Colleen Slevin reports. (AP)

U.S. Rep. Ken Buck wants to amend tax reform legislation currently before Congress in order to prevent businesses from writing off sexual harassment payouts and settlements as ordinary business expenses. Joe St. George reports. (Fox31)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.