Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Nov. 2

Today’s news roundup includes the latest on a horrible shooting in Thornton last night, as well as details of plans for full-strength beer in grocery stores, the redevelopment of a historic campus in Southwest Denver and more.

The railyards and viaducts behind Union Station in 1908. (Library of Congress)

Hi. Today’s news roundup includes the latest on a horrible shooting in Thornton last night, as well as details of plans for full-strength beer in grocery stores, the redevelopment of a historic campus in Southwest Denver and more. Also, check out this cool map.

The railyards and viaducts behind Union Station in 1908. (Library of Congress)
The railyards and viaducts behind Union Station in 1908. (Library of Congress)

Breaking:

A gunman killed three people in a Thornton Walmart and remains at large. Update: A suspect was arrested Thursday morning. We’ll update this story as more information becomes available. (AP)

Government:

Denver is offering more assistance to residents struggling to heat their homes, keep the lights on and make rent. (Denverite)

Gov. John Hickenlooper released his proposed budget for 2018-19. It calls for the state to save more money before the next recession and includes a plan to shore up public employees’ pension fund. Erica has lots more important details. (Denverite)

Substances:

We should see a plan within a few weeks on how the state might roll out full-strength beer in gas stations and supermarkets, but a few major questions remain. (Denverite)

The feds are telling CBD companies to stop making unsubstantiated health claims, as Alicia Wallace reports. (Cannabist)

Education:

Outside groups have spent $1.5 million in efforts to influence Colorado school board races, and the total could eventually surpass $2 million. Nic Garcia reports. (Chalkbeat)

The governor’s proposed budget would increase Colorado schools funding by 4.5 percent, or $343 per student, including some cash from marijuana sales taxes to help with teacher shortages, as Yesenia Robles reports. (Chalkbeat)

Justice:

Michael Marshall, who was mentally ill, died after being restrained by deputies in county jail. Denver is set to pay his family a $4.65 million financial settlement. The city will also be changing jail policies and procedures in hopes of improving how guards deal with people with mental illness. (Denverite)

Development:

The historic Loretto Heights campus is set to be redeveloped by an Oakland-based firm. They’re interested in making a “residential village” and they’ll preserve at least the chapel and the administration building, as Thomas Gounley reports. (BusinessDen)

Denver has a $1.5 billion plan to add 39 gates at the airport. It’ll go before the Denver City Council over the next few weeks, Cathy Proctor reports. (DBJ)

The outdoors:

The U.S. Forest Service is officially launching its permitting program for Conundrum Hot Springs this summer, as Nathaniel Minor reports. In other words, you’ll have to make reservations for the beloved natural wonder/oft-trashed party spot. (CPR)

The mountains are due for snow this weekend. It’ll be a nice boost for resorts gearing up to open. Keystone, Copper and Breckenridge all are shooting for Nov. 10, with Winter Park to follow on Nov. 15. (Denverite)

Eating:

Tavernetta has completed post-kitchen fire repairs and will reopen next week. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.