Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Oct. 27

The mining camp at Animas Forks in the Animas River valley of San Juan County between 1877 and 1885. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. Our news podcast is out today with a fun discussion of the philosophy and politics of the proposed smoking ban for the 16th Street Mall. This news roundup, meanwhile, features more 4/20 drama, updates on lots of interesting little local stories and an investigation of the Nuggets’ shooting problem.

The mining camp at Animas Forks in the Animas River valley of San Juan County between 1877 and 1885. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
The mining camp at Animas Forks in the Animas River valley of San Juan County between 1877 and 1885. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Cannabis:

A bunch of hemp-centric businesses are setting up shop in an unused school in Montrose County. Jason Blevins asks whether non-narcotic marijuana is the next big thing for rural Colorado. (DP)

Contractors say they’re still owed close to $40,000 in unpaid bills from the 4/20 organizers. (Denverite)

Democratic senators are rallying against the proposed fee increase that could make it $70 to get into Rocky Mountain NP next summer. (AP)

Outdoors:

Blevins also has a preview of the huge Outdoor Retailer show that will begin its five-year run in Denver this January. (DP)

The $40 million project to revamp City Park Golf Course will be allowed to proceed as a lawsuit failed to stop it.

Another judge says Denver unconstitutionally banned a man from parks, but the city will try a similar policy again.

You should get snow tires. But which ones? (Denverite)

Housing:

Megan took a look at how much it costs to have a rent at apartments around Denver. (Denverite)

Transportation:

Arvada Mayor Marc Williams is ratcheting up the pressure on state regulators, who still haven’t approved the G Line for final testing even though the feds have. Nathaniel Minor reports. (CPR)

CDOT head Shailen Bhatt has resigned after less than three years to go work at an advocacy group for road and transportation tech. (Denverite)

Entertainment:

Howie Movshovitz has suggestions for viewing at the Denver Film Festival, which starts next Wednesday and runs through Nov. 12. (KUNC)

Ashley has a lovely list of weekend things to do! (Denverite)

Politics:

Fair Districts Colorado wants to reduce gerrymandering by changing how the state sets its political boundaries. It now has a very wealthy backer, Kent Thiry, and a new approach, but critics say its central problem is that its proposals still allow political parties to appoint the people who draw the lines. Corey Hutchins reports. (Independent)

Sports:

Here’s one problem with the Nuggets — they’re taking all kinds of bad shots. Christian investigates. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.