Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Oct. 6

Berry's Drive-in Restaurant at West Colfax and Salisbury in 1956. (Richard Crowther Architectural Records/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hi. Today’s news roundup includes our latest batch of Colfax Week stories, a few local business developments and a major update for the fluffiest field bird in the West.

Berry's Drive-in Restaurant at West Colfax and Salisbury in 1956. (Richard Crowther Architectural Records/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Berry’s Drive-in Restaurant at West Colfax and Salisbury in 1956. (Richard Crowther Architectural Records/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

The weekend:

Ashley has your guide to the weekend’s happenings. It’ll be 80 degrees on Saturday!

One thing to do: Get ready for accumulating snow on Monday and a hard freeze. WTF. (Denverite)

Great American Beer Festival is happening. Eric Gorski has some more suggestions for those of you who don’t have tickets, and he asks whether GABF is worth it for brewers. (Denverite)

Colfax Week continues:

Ashley takes us to meet Nob Hill Inn, possibly the oldest dive bar on East Colfax, and its morning crowd. (Denverite)

I am trying to figure out who really said that Colfax was the “longest, wickedest street in America.” We’ve had no luck with the Playboy archive, but we did find some choice Colfax quotes anyway. (Denverite)

West Colfax in Lakewood has always been suburban. Can the city change that? I wrote about what’s happened since the W Line was built, and what they’re still waiting on. (Denverite)

Podcast time:

Erica and Paul have a nice, nuanced conversation about gentrification. Megan gives an update on the 16th Street Mall. Listen local, fools. (Denverite)

Art:

Michael Paglia reports that Lawrence Argent, sculptor of Denver’s giant blue bear statue and many other words, died suddenly on Oct. 4. (Westword)

Law:

After years of confusion, the Denver District Attorney’s Office has said that the Denver Board of Ethics will handle any ethics complaints against the DA. Chris Walker reports. (Westword)

Business:

DigitalGlobe, the Denver-based satellite imagery company, has been purchased by a Canadian company for $2.4 billion, Tamara Chuang reports. (DP)

The owner of Colorado Mills is breaking ground on a new mall in Thornton. (Denverite)

Environment:

The feds will reexamine and possibly reduce protections of the greater sage-grouse. Oil and gas drillers have complained about the restrictions on their use of the sagebrush where the flamboyant bird lives. An earlier federal report suggested shifting management to the states. (WP)

Sports:

Jonathan Lucroy goes up for free agency, which could take him from the Rockies. It sounds like he wouldn’t mind staying. (Denverite)

Denver’s in the running to be part of the multi-country North American bid for the 2026 World Cup. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.