Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Sept. 11

Kids and teenagers in line at the entrance of the old Tabor Theater on 16th Street on Christmas Eve, 1935. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/X-24746

Hi. We’ve got a lighter news roundup today, but it’s all good stuff. As always, we’ll be back tomorrow with more.

Kids and teenagers in line at the entrance of the old Tabor Theater on 16th Street on Christmas Eve, 1935. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/X-24746
Kids and teenagers in line at the entrance of the old Tabor Theater on 16th Street on Christmas Eve, 1935. (Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library/X-24746

Weather:

Expect temperatures in the high 80s and chances of storms for most of this week. (Denverite)

This weekend, an incoming storm could drop some much-needed precipitation on fires in the Pacific Northwest and the northern Rockies, but it also could bring increased fire danger to the Front Range, according to Joel Gratz. It may drop some snowflakes above 11,000 feet in Colorado’s northern mountains this weekend. (OpenSnow)

Sports & recreation:

If you want a Rocky Mountain Super Pass, you should buy it today before prices go up tomorrow. If you’re undecided on your ski season plan, read this. If you don’t give a damn, I’m sorry. (Denverite)

The Rockies won four times in a row. Part of their most recent recent victory: a wild-and-crazy strategy where the pitcher doesn’t give the batter infinite time to prepare for the pitch, as Christian explains. (Denverite)

Development:

More than 6,000 Lakewood voters appear to support a proposal that would ask the city to limit the construction of new housing. Opponents are trying to keep that question off the ballot, though, by saying that the slow-growthers didn’t follow the city’s election rules. It’s turned into a very long court affair, as Clarke Reader reports. (Lakewood Sentinel)

Why aren’t local neighborhoods getting as much influence as other groups on the authority that will direct the new National Western Center? Because they didn’t put in as much money as Colorado State University and the stock show. Erica reports. (Denverite)

Megan has four real-estate numbers that show residents are still priced out in high numbers even while real-estate agents are starting to see a change in the market. (Denverite)

Local startup FareHarbor makes money, owns its niche and is growing fast. Tamara Chuang makes the case. (DP)

Transportation:

An unused bus lane on Larimer Street has been converted to a protected bike lane, which should improve biking from Auraria across Cherry Creek and into downtown. (Urbanism)

Politics:

Colorado Mountain College is trying to get around the state’s restrictive budget rules with an unusual new tactic: They want to ask voters for the perpetual right “to raise property taxes any time the state constitution requires a cut to residential property assessments,” as Brian Eason reports. (DP)

Chalkbeat has canvassed the state, finding out how schools are handling the threat to the DACA program that protects many of their undocumented students. (Chalkbeat)

Entertainment:

Eater has your restaurant recommendations for September. El Five, the Mediterranean place, looks like it needs me to be there. (Eater)

Interesting events:

April Bohnert has pulled together some interesting tech events this week. I might go to the user experience/urban planning thing. (These events are labeled as “August,” but they’re really happening this week.) (BuiltIn)

 

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.