Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Sept. 26

The tracks of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad follow the bends of the Colorado River in Bond, Colorado, in Eagle County. (E.T. Bollinger collection/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Hello, readers. Today’s news roundup covers everything from the big questions — does the Colorado River have rights? — to the little Denver details, including the opening date of a certain downtown grocery store. Let’s get to it.

The tracks of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad follow the bends of the Colorado River in Bond, Colorado, in Eagle County. (E.T. Bollinger collection/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
The tracks of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad follow the bends of the Colorado River in Bond, Colorado, in Eagle County. (E.T. Bollinger collection/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Housing:

Erica Meltzer was at the City Council meeting ridiculously late as neighbors argued over a new historic district in West Highland. The council approved the district in a split decision. It was an interesting conversation about the value of historic buildings and the best way to protect them, and there was also a Buffalo Bill cameo. (Denverite)

Tenants facing eviction had legal representation in just 1 to 3 percent of the thousands of local cases studied by the Colorado Center of Law and Policy. Megan reports on the push to make legal assistance more widely available. (Denverite)

Business & economy:

The new Whole Foods at Union Station is set to open before Thanksgiving, and the Cap Hill store will close shortly before that, as Adrian reports, along with some more details about the Union site. (Denverite)

It’s Denver Startup Week. (Denverite)

Many of Colorado’s “economically distressed areas” are clustered in the southern part of the state, as Tom McGhee reports. (DP)

Health and environment:

A federal lawsuit filed by a Denver attorney asks a judge to recognize the Colorado River’s rights, alleging that the state and the governor of Colorado have violated its “right to exist, flourish, regenerate, be restored, and naturally evolve,” as The New York Times reported. The attorney is Jason Flores-Williams, best known for his class-action lawsuit on the rights of homeless people. He’s working with Deep Green Resistance. Fascinating context here. (NYT)

Sen. Cory Gardner reportedly told other Republicans that “donors are furious” that GOP health-care legislation keeps failing. By Erica’s analysis, the Colorado senator is very unlikely to vote against any Republican health-care proposal. (Denverite)

Sporting:

The head of the U.S. Olympic Committee just floated Denver, Salt Lake City and Reno as possibilities for the 2026 or 2030 games. (AP)

The Rockies lost again. They’re now in a desperate fight for the “wild card” — a single game that they’d still have to win to get into the playoffs. (Denverite)

The Nuggets say their players are free to speak and protest in whatever way they want, as Christian reports. (Denverite)

Colorado’s ski areas are making snow for this winter. It’s a bit earlier than usual, but there are no promises, folks. (Denverite)

A man was cited for breaking a sculpture of two trout in Colorado Springs with a “flying leap” attack, which I’m going to categorize as “sports.” The sculpture has been repaired. (Gazette)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.