Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Nov. 1

Members of the AdAmAn Club climb the Pikes Peak Cog Railway tracks on New Year's Eve to set off fireworks sometime between 1922 and 1941. (Harry L. Standley/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Good morning. Here’s your news roundup, with stories on the next wave of cell towers (they’re going to be everywhere), a major shift in the Republican race for governor in Colorado and more.

Members of the AdAmAn Club climb the Pikes Peak Cog Railway tracks on New Year's Eve to set off fireworks sometime between 1922 and 1941. (Harry L. Standley/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Members of the AdAmAn Club climb the Pikes Peak Cog Railway tracks on New Year’s Eve to set off fireworks sometime between 1922 and 1941. (Harry L. Standley/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

In your neighborhood:

“Small cell” sites should improve service, but residents and city officials are starting to worry as hundreds are planted in residential neighborhoods with little local oversight, as I reported. (Denverite)

Health and environment:
A new study from the Boulder-based National Center for Atmospheric Research pinpoints the sources of ozone in the Denver metro area. Drivers contribute roughly as much as oil and gas production. The good news is that changing your transportation habits can reduce pollution. Kevin reports. (Denverite)

Your health insurance premiums on the Colorado exchange might shrink 20 percent this year — but only if you qualify for subsidies. If you make more than $48,000 as an individual, get ready for some steep hikes. John Ingold reports. (DP)

The Denver VA is delaying and canceling surgeries due to a lack of anestheseologists. Rob Low reports. (KDVR)

The Navajo Nation Council has rejected a controversial plan to build a tram down to a sacred site in the Grand Canyon. (Gazette)

Undoing the protections for the greater sage grouse could ruin future efforts to protect animals too, as the governor told the Trump administration. Dan Elliott reports. (AP)

Real estate and business:

The Overlook at Mile High, a sprawling 50-year-old apartment complex near Federal and Colfax, just sold for $97 million. No word on planned changes. John Rebchook reports. (CREJ)

Fewer people visited Colorado’s ski areas last winter, but the resort towns are collecting more money than ever. (Sentinel)

Politics:

Tom Tancredo, widely seen as one of the furthest-right politicians in Colorado, could “immediately become the frontrunner” in the Republican race for governor. Erica reports. (Denverite)

Culture:

The song “All They Will Call You,” famously covered by Joan Baez and Bruce Springsteen, has its roots in Fort Collins at a party with Pete Seeger. Stacy Nick reports. (KUNC)

There’s a new “Korean-inspired” place coming to Zeppelin Station. Also, Punch Bowl Social opens in Stapleton on Nov. 18. Ashley reports. (Denverite)

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.