Denver is 1 of 7 cities with housing prices above pre-recession levels

A high rise in the Cheesman Park neighborhood. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

residential real estate; house; home; cheesman park; denver; denverite; kevinjbeaty; colorado;
Homes in the Cheesman Park neighborhood. Cheesman Park. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) residential real estate; house; home; cheesman park; denver; denverite; kevinjbeaty; colorado;
Homes in the Cheesman Park neighborhood. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The Case-Shiller national index, a stalwart in the world of home price measurements, says home prices have almost hit the record highs set in July 2006.

Denver, on the other hand, has already passed 2006 levels and blown a raspberry at them, the index finds.

The index has base value of 100 in January 2000. So index values above 100 indicate an increase in home prices.
The index has base value of 100 in January 2000. So index values above 100 indicate an increase in home prices.

Within the past six months, home prices have only risen faster in Portland and Seattle. That trend continued this July: Portland led with a 12.4 percent year-over-year price increase, then Seattle, with a 11.2 percent increase, and finally Denver with a 9.4 percent increase.

Among 20 major metropolitan areas, average year-over-year prices increased 5 percent.

The Case-Shiller index looks at resales of stand-alone single-family homes, not new construction or condominiums.