Denver ready to spend $200,000 on legal defense for immigrants, including DACA

Known as the Denver Immigrant Legal Services Fund, it’s meant to support people who are facing deportation or who need other legal help.

The Colorado Immigrants Rights Coalition holds a short vigil outside Senator Michael Bennet's office in Capitol Hill asking for a "clean" DREAM Act bill, Dec. 8, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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Denver’s city government today will launch a $200,000 fund that will help immigrants get lawyers through a nonprofit.

Known as the Denver Immigrant Legal Services Fund, it’s meant to support people who are facing deportation or who need other legal help. That includes providing lawyers for young people trying to keep their DACA status.

The idea has been in development since at least last year. Mayor Michael Hancock mentioned it in an executive order and later included $100,000 for it in a budget proposal.

The Denver City Council upped the ante, voting in November to double the city’s spending to $200,000. The program also will be supported by $100,000 from the Vera Institute, $30,000 from the Rose Community Foundation, $50,000 from the City of Denver Support Fund and $5,000 from the Denver foundation, for a total of $385,000.

The program will be run by The Denver Foundation.

Separately, Denver council members have banded together to create a similar fund for people facing eviction.

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.