Map: Here’s where rabid skunks are running Denver’s streets

Denver residents have found four rabid skunks in the last four weeks, and that’s a darn good reason to make sure your pets are vaccinated.

A skunk. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr)
A skunk. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr)
A skunk. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr)

Denver residents have found four rabid skunks in the last four weeks, and that’s a darn good reason to make sure your pets are vaccinated.

The skunks were found on the following blocks:

  • 4800 Meade St.
  • 2400 W. 26th Ave.
  • 850 N. Knox Ct.
  • 1360 N. Zenobia St.

So, Interstate 25 seems to be some kind of protective barrier.

Seriously: Rabies is a real viral threat. It often is fatal for animals and people alike. Rabies most often are found in skunks and bats, but it can appear in other animals.

Animals with rabies may:

  • Show aggression, confusion or a lack of fear around people
  • Stagger, tremble or seem weak
  • Be out in the day, which is unusual for nocturnal animals such as skunks
  • Bats may be on the ground

What you can do:

  • Do not touch, feed or adopt wild or rabid animals
  • Do teach your kids to leave animals alone
  • Keep your vaccinations up to date
  • Close your garbage cans tightly
  • Feed your pets indoors
  • Don’t mess with skunks and bats

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.