Rene Lima-Marin, freed twice from Colorado prisons, now has a chance to fight deportation

After being freed from prison and pardoned by Gov. John Hickenlooper, he will be allowed to fight for his right to stay in the United States.

Jasmine Lima-Marin hugs Marilyn Stranske after a press conference on her husband's case at the Hans Meyer Law Office, May 19, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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Jasmine Lima-Marin hugs Marilyn Stranske after a press conference on her husband's case at the Hans Meyer Law Office, May 19, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) rene lima-marin; immigration; deportation; hans meyer law office; kevinjbeaty; denver; colorado; denverite;
Jasmine Lima-Marin hugs Marilyn Stranske after a press conference on her husband’s case at the Hans Meyer Law Office, May 19, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Rene Lima-Marin has won a “major victory” in his unusual legal battle, according to his attorney: After being freed from prison and pardoned by Gov. John Hickenlooper, he will be allowed to fight for his right to stay in the United States.

Lima-Marin was mistakenly released from prison in 2008, only eight years into his 98-year sentence for an armed robbery case. He was returned to prison in 2014, then freed again this year by a judge.

He was almost immediately picked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents as he tried to return to his wife and two children. Because he is a legal permanent resident, and not a citizen, the felony conviction makes him eligible for deportation.

Hickenlooper then pardoned Lima-Marin of his crimes in an attempt to bolster the man’s immigration case. But with a deportation order pending, it seemed likely Lima-Marin would be sent back to Cuba, a country he left at age 2.

However, he got a new reason for hope on July 31, when an immigration judge withdrew the order of removal and allowed Lima-Marin to reopen the case, according to the Meyer Law Office.

“Today, we achieve a significant victory in a hard-fought battle, and while the war to keep Rene here with his family is not yet over, we are on the right side of history,” attorney Hans Meyer said in a written release.

Lima-Marin’s first hearing in the new immigration case was expected to happen this afternoon.

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.