Snow’s gone, sprinklers on, but first read Denver’s rules for lawns

Summer is coming to kill your grass.

Michael Lanford waters his lawn. Elyria-Swansea, April 11, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

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Dogs on the lawn at Washington Park. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) washington park; fourth of july; independence day; denver; colorado; kevinjbeaty; denverite;
Dogs on the lawn at Washington Park. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Summer is coming to kill your grass. If you’re not ready to give up and zero-scape (as opposed to xeriscape!) that stuff, you’ll need to obey the Denver metro’s rules on lawn watering, which go into effect today, May 1.

First, the rules, straight from the water horse’s mouth. These rules apply across Denver Water’s service area, including Lakewood, Wheat Ridge, Littleton, Lone Tree, Centennial and more:

  • Water during cooler times of the day — lawn watering is not allowed between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
  • Water no more than three days per week.
  • Do not allow water to pool in gutters, streets and alleys.
  • Do not waste water by letting it spray on concrete and asphalt.
  • Repair leaking sprinkler systems within 10 days.
  • Do not irrigate while it is raining or during high winds.
  • Use a hose nozzle with a shut-off valve when washing your car.
  • You can water at your leisure for 21 days after laying new seed or sod.

Breaking any of these rules can result in a fine, though Denver Water hasn’t actually fined anyone in the last two summers. The “Water Savers” patrol has, however, issued hundreds of violations in recent summers.

“We consider that a good thing,” wrote spokesman Travis Thompson, “because our goal is to educate customers about our watering rules.”

If you want to snitch on your wasteful neighbor, call 303-893-2444 or do it online.

But why should I conserve water?

Denver Water also would remind you that Denver remained in severe drought before this weekend’s snowstorm, and that the Colorado River, one of our main supplies, has been in drought for a decade.

And if you need advice on how to conserve water while also not killing your lawn, the utility has you covered on that too.

Andrew Kenney

Author: Andrew Kenney

Andrew Kenney writes about public spaces, Denver phenomena and whatever else. He previously worked for six years as a reporter at The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. His most prized possession is his collection of bizarre voicemail. Leave him one at 303-502-2803, or email akenney@denverite.com.