Mike Coffman asks FCC to delay net neutrality vote, becomes the first Republican to do so

Net neutrality is the idea that internet service providers should treat all content, websites and applications the same, and it’s under threat.

Net neutrality is the idea that internet service providers should treat all content, websites and applications the same, without preferential treatment for those who can pay more, and it’s under threat.

The Federal Communications Commission is widely expected to repeal the 2015 order that guarantees net neutrality, and it’s become a largely partisan issue. On Tuesday, U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman of Aurora became the first Republican to say the FCC should delay its vote so that Congress can act instead.


Deportations increased more in Colorado than anywhere else

The number of people deported from Colorado and Wyoming increased by close to 150 percent in fiscal year 2017.

Students raise their hands to show that they know someone who has been deported. Thousands walked out of class to attend a rally on the Auraria campus in response to the repeal of DACA, Sept. 5, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) daca; undocumented; immigration; tivoli student union; auraria campus; rally; protest; walkout; kevinjbeaty; denver; denverite; colorado;
Students raise their hands to show that they know someone who has been deported on Sept. 5, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The number of people deported from Colorado and Wyoming increased by close to 150 percent in the fiscal year 2017, according to new statistics from the Department of Homeland Security.

It was the highest rate of increase among the nation’s 25 immigration enforcement areas, and it demonstrates that Immigration and Customs Enforcement is shifting its attention to the interior states.

In some cases, ICE has arrested people at courthouses and in other “low-hanging” situations, according to Jennifer Kain-Rios, an independent immigration attorney.

“We’re seeing basically indiscriminate enforcement,” she told Denverite earlier this year.


All eyes and ears are on Kennedy as Supreme Court hears Lakewood wedding cake case

His vote likely to decide the outcome, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy voiced competing concerns about religious freedom and civil rights.

The Masterpiece Cakeshop in Littleton is closed as owners testify before the U.S. Supreme Court, Dec. 4, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; littleton; scotus; masterpiece cakeshop;
The Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood is closed as owners testify before the U.S. Supreme Court, Dec. 4, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Mark Sherman, Associated Press

WASHINGTON — On a sharply divided Supreme Court, the justice in the middle seemed conflicted Tuesday in the court’s high-stakes consideration of a baker who refused to make a wedding case for a same-sex couple in 2012.

The court’s fault lines were laid bare in a riveting argument that focused equally on baker Jack Phillips’ right to refuse to put his artistic talents to use in support of something in which he disagrees and the Colorado couple’s right to be treated like any other two people who wanted a cake to celebrate their marriage.


A Colorado gay couple were refused a cake for their wedding, but the Supreme Court case is about much more

Oral arguments before the Supreme Court start Dec. 5 in a case with profound implications for gay rights and the role of religion in public life.

By David Crary, Associated Press

In a legal case with profound implications for LGBT rights and religion’s place in public life, the opposing sides agree on this: It’s not about the cake.

At its core, the case that goes before the U.S. Supreme Court for oral arguments on Dec. 5 is a showdown between a gay couple from Colorado and a Denver-area baker who in 2012 cited his Christian faith in refusing to make a cake for their wedding celebration.


Money for children’s health insurance program is running out fast in Colorado

Congress failed to reauthorize CHIP before the program expired in September. Colorado is among the first states expected to deplete its remaining funds.

By Steve Karnowski and Jim Anderson, Associated Press

TC Bell knows what life is like without health insurance after growing up with a mother who cobbled together care from a public health clinic, emergency room visits and off-the-books visits to a doctor they knew.

That memory makes Bell, of Denver, grateful for the coverage his two daughters have now under the Children’s Health Insurance Program — and concerned about its uncertain future in Congress.